Giving up self-injury: A comparison of everyday social and personal resources in past versus current self-injurers

Rotolone, Cassandra and Martin, Graham (2012) Giving up self-injury: A comparison of everyday social and personal resources in past versus current self-injurers. Archives of Suicide Research, 16 2: 147-158.


Author Rotolone, Cassandra
Martin, Graham
Total Author Count Override 2
Title Giving up self-injury: A comparison of everyday social and personal resources in past versus current self-injurers
Journal name Archives of Suicide Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1381-1118
1543-6136
Publication date 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/13811118.2012.667333
Volume 16
Issue 2
Start page 147
End page 158
Total pages 12
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher Routledge
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract Self-injury represents a common yet perplexing set of behaviors, considered difficult to treat. The current study aimed to identify social and personal resources that may aid in cessation of self-injury. A community sample of 312 participants completed an online questionnaire. In line with Brown and Williams (2007), we compared all self-injurers (current and past) (106, 34%) with those who had never self-injured (206, 66%), and then current (38, 12.2%) with past self-injurers (68, 21.8%). Overall, self-injurers reported significantly lower levels of perceived social support, social connectedness, resilience, self-esteem, and life satisfaction compared to those with no such history. Further analysis indicated that family support, self-esteem, resilience, and satisfaction with life were significantly better for past compared to current self-injurers (at the p < 0.01 level). Logistic regression suggested that self-injurers could be distinguished from non self-injurers on Self-esteem and Social Connectedness. A further logistic regression suggested that past self-injurers could be distinguished from current self-injurers by their level of Resilience. The research has important preventive and clinical implications.
Keyword Cessation
Life satisfaction
Protective factors
Resilience
Self-esteem
Social connectedness
Self-injury
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
School of Psychology Publications
 
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