Applying Motivational Interviewing to the initiation of long-acting injectable atypical antipsychotics

Kisely, Steve, Ligate, Loys, Roy, Marc-André and Lavery, Terri (2012) Applying Motivational Interviewing to the initiation of long-acting injectable atypical antipsychotics. Australasian Psychiatry, 20 2: 138-142. doi:10.1177/1039856212437257


Author Kisely, Steve
Ligate, Loys
Roy, Marc-André
Lavery, Terri
Title Applying Motivational Interviewing to the initiation of long-acting injectable atypical antipsychotics
Journal name Australasian Psychiatry   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1039-8562
1440-1665
Publication date 2012-04
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/1039856212437257
Volume 20
Issue 2
Start page 138
End page 142
Total pages 5
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Sage Publications
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: Non-concordance with pharmacotherapy is common in psychiatric patients. Long-acting injectable atypical antipsychotic (LAI AA) medication may improve adherence but patients and clinicians may be reluctant to consider this alternative. This paper describes the application of Motivational Interviewing (MI) to the commencement of LAI AA.
Method: We developed a workshop applying the principles of MI to address medication adherence through the use of LAIs. This includes a training video to illustrate the following motivational techniques, as summarised by the acronym OARS: (a) Open questions; (b) Affirmation of patients’ self-efficacy and support; (c) Reflections of patients’ thoughts, desires, abilities, reasons, needs, and commitments; (d) Summaries of the patient’s history to promote consideration of change.
Results: We delivered four workshops across Canada. Results of feedback (n=25) were encouraging.
Conclusions: Motivational Interviewing has many applications in psychiatric care for engagement in treatment, reduction in alcohol or substance misuse, and improving medication acceptance and adherence. Further research is required to assess whether changes in physicians’ views are reflected in improved adherence.
Keyword Adherence
Concordance
Long-acting injectables
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
School of Medicine Publications
 
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