Susan Dackerman, ed., Prints and the Pursuit of Knowledge in Early Modern Europe. Suzanne Karr Schmidt, Altered and Adorned: Using Reniassance Prints in Daily Life

Bubenik, Andrea (2012) Susan Dackerman, ed., Prints and the Pursuit of Knowledge in Early Modern Europe. Suzanne Karr Schmidt, Altered and Adorned: Using Reniassance Prints in Daily Life. Script and Print: Bulletin of the Bibliographical Society of Australia and New Zealand., 36 1: 54-57.

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Author Bubenik, Andrea
Title Susan Dackerman, ed., Prints and the Pursuit of Knowledge in Early Modern Europe. Suzanne Karr Schmidt, Altered and Adorned: Using Reniassance Prints in Daily Life
Journal name Script and Print: Bulletin of the Bibliographical Society of Australia and New Zealand.
ISSN 0084-7852
1834-9013
Publication date 2012
Sub-type Review of book, film, TV, video, software, performance, music etc
Volume 36
Issue 1
Start page 54
End page 57
Total pages 4
Place of publication Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Publisher Bibliographical Society of Australia & New Zealand
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Most early modern prints are not displayed with great frequency in today’s museums: small in scale, sensitive to the elements, and seemingly esoteric to the untrained eye, they are more often than not hidden from the view of visitors, who tend to be more eager to see large scale works of painting and sculpture. When prints are displayed, it is often to highlight their aesthetic qualities, or perhaps as part of the oeuvre of a major printmaker such as Dürer or Rembrandt. The irony in all of this is that during the early modern period prints were amongst the most used (and abused) of all art objects. The reproducibility of prints and their existence as works on paper made them available in great numbers to a diverse cross section of the population. Simply put, they were far more accessible and affordable than coveted luxury items such as paintings and tapestries. Prints were used in a variety of contexts, and as much as being objects of studied admiration and beauty, they also played essential roles in scholarly activities and the practicalities of daily lives.

These untold histories of early modern prints are the subject of two remarkable publications, Prints and the Pursuit of Knowledge in Early Modern Europe and Altered and Adorned: The Use of Prints in Daily Life; each the accompanying catalogue for a related exhibition at the Harvard Art Museum and the Art Institute of Chicago respectively. It is instructive to consider what these catalogues have in common. Both are less concerned with the mechanics of how prints were created and their aesthetic qualities, emphasising instead the uses they subsequently endured. Both publications draw attention to lesser known prints that have previously defied easy categorization and in some cases have escaped scholarly attention entirely. Together, these catalogues have potentially ushered in a new chapter in print scholarship.
Q-Index Code CX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown
Additional Notes Full title: "Susan Dackerman, ed., Prints and the Pursuit of Knowledge in Early Modern Europe. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2011. 442 pp. 297 colour illus. ISBN: 978 0 300 17107 5. US$60. Suzanne Karr Schmidt, Altered and Adorned: Using Reniassance Prints in Daily Life. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2011. 112 pp. 98 colour illus. ISBN: 978 0 300 16911 9. US$35."

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Review of book, film, TV, video, software, performance, music etc
Collection: School of Communication and Arts Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 31 May 2012, 15:54:52 EST by Andrea Bubenik on behalf of School of Communication and Arts