Breaking up prolonged sitting reduces postprandial glucose and insulin responses

Dunstan, David W., Kingwell, Bronwyn A., Larsen, Robyn, Healy, Genevieve N., Cerin, Ester, Hamilton, Marc T., Shaw, Jonathan E., Bertovic, David A,, Zimmet, Paul Z., Salmon, Jo and Owen, Neville (2012). Breaking up prolonged sitting reduces postprandial glucose and insulin responses. In: Diabetes Care. Annual Conference of the International Society for Behavioural Nutrition and Physical Activity, Melbourne, Australia, (976-983). 15-18 June 2011. doi:10.2337/dc11-1931

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Author Dunstan, David W.
Kingwell, Bronwyn A.
Larsen, Robyn
Healy, Genevieve N.
Cerin, Ester
Hamilton, Marc T.
Shaw, Jonathan E.
Bertovic, David A,
Zimmet, Paul Z.
Salmon, Jo
Owen, Neville
Title of paper Breaking up prolonged sitting reduces postprandial glucose and insulin responses
Conference name Annual Conference of the International Society for Behavioural Nutrition and Physical Activity
Conference location Melbourne, Australia
Conference dates 15-18 June 2011
Proceedings title Diabetes Care   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Diabetes Care   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Alexandria, VA, United States
Publisher American Diabetes Association
Publication Year 2012
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.2337/dc11-1931
ISSN 0149-5992
1935-5548
Volume 35
Issue 5
Start page 976
End page 983
Total pages 8
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
OBJECTIVE Observational studies show breaking up prolonged sitting has beneficial associations with cardiometabolic risk markers, but intervention studies are required to investigate causality. We examined the acute effects on postprandial glucose and insulin levels of uninterrupted sitting compared with sitting interrupted by brief bouts of light- or moderate-intensity walking.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Overweight/obese adults (n = 19), aged 45–65 years, were recruited for a randomized three-period, three-treatment acute crossover trial: 1) uninterrupted sitting; 2) seated with 2-min bouts of light-intensity walking every 20 min; and 3) seated with 2-min bouts of moderate-intensity walking every 20 min. A standardized test drink was provided after an initial 2-h period of uninterrupted sitting. The positive incremental area under curves (iAUC) for glucose and insulin (mean [95% CI]) for the 5 h after the test drink (75 g glucose, 50 g fat) were calculated for the respective treatments.

RESULTS The glucose iAUC (mmol/L) ⋅ h after both activity-break conditions was reduced (light: 5.2 [4.1–6.6]; moderate: 4.9 [3.8–6.1]; both P < 0.01) compared with uninterrupted sitting (6.9 [5.5–8.7]). Insulin iAUC (pmol/L) ⋅ h was also reduced with both activity-break conditions (light: 633.6 [552.4–727.1]; moderate: 637.6 [555.5–731.9], P < 0.0001) compared with uninterrupted sitting (828.6 [722.0–950.9]).

CONCLUSIONS Interrupting sitting time with short bouts of light- or moderate-intensity walking lowers postprandial glucose and insulin levels in overweight/obese adults. This may improve glucose metabolism and potentially be an important public health and clinical intervention strategy for reducing cardiovascular risk.
Keyword Type-2 diabetic patients
Fasting plasma glucose
Middle-aged women
Oxidative stress
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
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