ASSESSING ENERGY REQUIREMENTS AND BODY COMPOSITION: IMPLICATIONS FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE

Sarah Elliott (2011). ASSESSING ENERGY REQUIREMENTS AND BODY COMPOSITION: IMPLICATIONS FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE PhD Thesis, School of Medicine, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Sarah Elliott
Thesis Title ASSESSING ENERGY REQUIREMENTS AND BODY COMPOSITION: IMPLICATIONS FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE
School, Centre or Institute School of Medicine
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2011-11
Thesis type PhD Thesis
Supervisor Professor Peter SW Davies
Total pages 453
Total colour pages 72
Total black and white pages 381
Language eng
Subjects 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
110904 Neurology and Neuromuscular Diseases
111403 Paediatrics
Abstract/Summary Paediatric obesity arises as a result of a positive energy balance. A positive energy balance may be due to a reduced energy expenditure or increased energy intake. The reduced energy expenditure is often due to a reduced energy cost of activity, but a reduction in energy expenditure at rest can sometimes occur. In some disease states, such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy, energy imbalance may be a result of a decrease in resting energy expenditure, due to alterations in body composition, or energy metabolism. Regardless of the aetiology, the basis of dietary prescription to create an energy deficit relies on the accurate assessment of energy requirements. The use of the doubly labelled water method to measure total energy expenditure, and in turn, energy requirements, is impractical and costly in a clinical setting. As a result, predictive equations and self-reported measures of physical activity and energy intake, to establish baseline energy requirements, are frequently used. Current equations are based on data obtained from healthy paediatric populations, and the use of such equations to estimate energy requirements in populations whom differ from the norm are yet to be established. Furthermore, the accurate assessment of body composition is vital for evaluating and monitoring the success of various management programmes. While many body composition analysis techniques were developed in healthy adult populations, the use of these techniques in clinical, paediatric populations is questionable. To provide an insight into these issues, this thesis explored the assessment of energy requirements and body composition in two different paediatric cohorts (obese children and adolescents, and ambulatory boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy). Additionally, the feasibility of a reduced dose of isotopes in the doubly labelled water technique was assessed in a cohort of healthy control children.
Keyword Paediatics and child health
Body composition -- Measurement
Energy Requirements
Duchenne muscular dystrophy
Doubly labelled water
Total Energy Expenditure
Additional Notes Colour Pages: 1,44,45,46,47,59,60,63,81,116,120,121,124,126,131,133,136,141,144,148,152,156,159,164,166, 167,179,180,181,182,191,192,193,204,205,206,207,208,220,221,222,223,250,251,258,259,260,261,262,263,264,273,274,275,276,277,278,279,290,300,301,302,311,312,313,314,328,329,330,331,332,333. Landscape Pages: 44,46,59,133,328,329,426,428,429,431,432,444,445,446,447,448.

 
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