Benefits of thermal acclimation in a tropical aquatic ectotherm, the Arafura filesnake, Acrochordus arafurae

Bruton, Melissa J., Cramp, Rebecca L. and Franklin, Craig E. (2012) Benefits of thermal acclimation in a tropical aquatic ectotherm, the Arafura filesnake, Acrochordus arafurae. Journal of Comparative Physiology B: Biochemical Systemic and Environmental Physiology, 182 4: 541-551. doi:10.1007/s00360-011-0643-6


Author Bruton, Melissa J.
Cramp, Rebecca L.
Franklin, Craig E.
Title Benefits of thermal acclimation in a tropical aquatic ectotherm, the Arafura filesnake, Acrochordus arafurae
Formatted title
Benefits of thermal acclimation in a tropical aquatic ectotherm, the Arafura filesnake, Acrochordus arafurae
Journal name Journal of Comparative Physiology B: Biochemical Systemic and Environmental Physiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0174-1578
1432-136X
Publication date 2012-05
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00360-011-0643-6
Volume 182
Issue 4
Start page 541
End page 551
Total pages 11
Place of publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publisher Springer
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The presumption that organisms benefit from thermal acclimation has been widely debated in the literature. The ability to thermally acclimate to offset temperature effects on physiological function is prevalent in ectotherms that are unable to thermoregulate year-round to maintain performance. In this study we examined the physiological and behavioural consequences of long-term exposure to different water temperatures in the aquatic snake Acrochordus arafurae. We hypothesised that long dives would benefit this species by reducing the likelihood of avian predation. To achieve longer dives at high temperatures, we predicted that thermal acclimation of A. arafurae would reduce metabolic rate and increase use of aquatic respiration. Acrochordus arafurae were held at 24 or 32°C for 3 months before dive duration and physiological factors were assessed (at both 24 and 32°C). Although filesnakes demonstrated thermal acclimation of metabolic rate, use of aquatic respiration was thermally independent and did not acclimate. Mean dive duration did not differ between the acclimation groups at either temperature; however, warm-acclimated animals increased maximum and modal dive duration, demonstrating a longer dive duration capacity. Our study established that A. arafurae is capable of thermal acclimation and this confers a benefit to the diving abilities of this snake.
Keyword Diving
Metabolic rate
Respiration
Reptile
Temperature
Predation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 4 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 5 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Mon, 21 May 2012, 22:18:10 EST by System User on behalf of School of Biological Sciences