Girls in Shinseinen, Shinseinen for Girls: The early comic novels of Hisao Juran

Aoyama, Tomoko (2012) Girls in Shinseinen, Shinseinen for Girls: The early comic novels of Hisao Juran. Japanese Studies, 32 1: 39-60. doi:10.1080/10371397.2012.670102

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Author Aoyama, Tomoko
Title Girls in Shinseinen, Shinseinen for Girls: The early comic novels of Hisao Juran
Formatted title
Girls in Shinseinen, Shinseinen for Girls: The early comic novels of Hisao Jūran
Journal name Japanese Studies   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1037-1397
1469-9338
Publication date 2012-05
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/10371397.2012.670102
Open Access Status
Volume 32
Issue 1
Start page 39
End page 60
Total pages 22
Place of publication Melbourne, Australia
Publisher Routledge
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Abstract Although Shinseinen is generally regarded as a magazine for young men, girls and young women made a significant contribution to it as writers, readers, and protagonists. One of the key contributors to the popular representations of young women in Shinseinen is Hisao Jūran (1902–1957). This paper focuses on two early comic novels Jūran serialised in Shinseinen soon after his return from Europe. In Nonsharan dōchūki [The Record of Nonchalant Travels] (1934), the ‘nonchalant’ girl heroine, Tanu (‘racoon’), and her partner, Konkichi (‘fox’), travel extensively in France, becoming involved in a series of slapstick nonsense and surrealistic events and accidents. In Fyūgu doree [The Golden Fugue] (1935) the same pair are caught up in a search for secret funds by representatives of various international crime syndicates. Both texts employ comic pedantry that involves cross-cultural and multilingual knowledge and sophistication. Notably, in Jūran's texts the comic elements tend to be assigned to women and girls. I will link this to Takahara Eiri's notion of the ‘consciousness of the girl’ and Tsurumi Shunsuke's interpretation of Ame no Uzume as a brave, subversive, and inclusive being. I will also cite Nakano Miyoko's parody of Jūran as a tribute to the freedom espoused in his nonsense slapstick pedantry.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Languages and Cultures Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 16 May 2012, 08:36:56 EST by Ms Katrina Hume on behalf of School of Languages and Cultures