The buffering effect of selection, optimization, and compensation strategy use on the relationship between problem solving demands and occupational well-being: A daily diary study

Schmitt, Antje, Zacher, Hannes and Frese, Michael (2012) The buffering effect of selection, optimization, and compensation strategy use on the relationship between problem solving demands and occupational well-being: A daily diary study. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 17 2: 139-149. doi:10.1037/a0027054


Author Schmitt, Antje
Zacher, Hannes
Frese, Michael
Title The buffering effect of selection, optimization, and compensation strategy use on the relationship between problem solving demands and occupational well-being: A daily diary study
Journal name Journal of Occupational Health Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1076-8998
1939-1307
Publication date 2012-04
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1037/a0027054
Volume 17
Issue 2
Start page 139
End page 149
Total pages 11
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher American Psychological Association
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Abstract This study investigated within-person relationships between daily problem solving demands, selection, optimization, and compensation (SOC) strategy use, job satisfaction, and fatigue at work. Based on conservation of resources theory, it was hypothesized that high SOC strategy use boosts the positive relationship between problem solving demands and job satisfaction, and buffers the positive relationship between problem solving demands and fatigue. Using a daily diary study design, data were collected from 64 administrative employees who completed a general questionnaire and two daily online questionnaires over four work days. Multilevel analyses showed that problem solving demands were positively related to fatigue, but unrelated to job satisfaction. SOC strategy use was positively related to job satisfaction, but unrelated to fatigue. A buffering effect of high SOC strategy use on the demands-fatigue relationship was found, but no booster effect on the demands-satisfaction relationship. The results suggest that high SOC strategy use is a resource that protects employees from the negative effects of high problem solving demands.
Keyword Problem solving demands
Fatigue
Job satisfaction
Selection/optimization/compensation (SOC)
Conservation of resources
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 14 May 2012, 22:00:19 EST by System User on behalf of School of Psychology