Ecology of ultramafic outcrops at Mount Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia

van der Ent, Antony (2011). Ecology of ultramafic outcrops at Mount Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia. In: 7th International Conference on Serpentine Ecology: Promoting Awareness of Serpentine Biodiversity. Abstract Book. International Conference on Serpentine Ecology (7th, ICSE, 2011), Coimbra, Portugal, (81-81). 12-16 June 2011.

Author van der Ent, Antony
Title of paper Ecology of ultramafic outcrops at Mount Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia
Conference name International Conference on Serpentine Ecology (7th, ICSE, 2011)
Conference location Coimbra, Portugal
Conference dates 12-16 June 2011
Proceedings title 7th International Conference on Serpentine Ecology: Promoting Awareness of Serpentine Biodiversity. Abstract Book
Place of Publication Coimbra, Portugal
Publisher University of Coimbra
Publication Year 2011
Sub-type Published abstract
Start page 81
End page 81
Total pages 1
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Mount Kinabalu’s (Malaysia) plant diversity contains >5,000 species in 200 families and 1,000 genera in an area of 1,200 km2, making it the most biodiverse place in the world in terms of number of different species-per-unit-area. Over 900 of the described plant species occur on ultramafics. Altitudinal-differentiated vegetation types on these ultramafics include, at increasing altitude, those characterized by: (i) Tristaniopsis elliptica; (ii) Leptospermum javanicum and Tristaniopsis elliptica; (iii) Leptospermum recurvum and Dacrydium gibbsiae, and at lower altitudes (iv) Gymnostoma sumatranum or Centhostoma teminale. Among the 860 orchid species (in 130 genera) on Mount Kinabalu, over 120 are ultramafic endemics, including: Paphiopedilum rothschildianum, Coelogyne rupicola, Platanthera kinabaluensis, Corybas kinabaluensis and Arachnis longisepala. Also characteristic of the Mount Kinabalu ultramafics are a number of endemics from the Nepenthaceae family (pitcher plants) including: N. rajah. N. burbidgeae and N. macrovulgaris. Known nickel hyperaccumulators in the region include: Rinorea bengalensis, Phyllanthus balgooyi and Dichapetalum gelonioides subsp. tuberculatum. The inherent geochemical differences between ultramafic and non-ultramafic substrates are more strongly reflected in the vegetation with increasing altitude. The primary precursors for the exceptional diversity in plant species on Mount Kinabalu are: 1) the isolation and recent mountain formation, 2) the occurrence of ultramafic soils, 3) the large altitudinal range with high maximum elevation and precipitous topography, 4) the setting in one of the most biodiversity-rich plant regions of the world, 5) the proximity of older mountain ranges, and 6) the spectrum of climatic zones, high rainfall and frequent El Niño-influenced events.
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Tue, 08 May 2012, 12:50:16 EST by Mr Antony Van Der Ent on behalf of Centre For Mined Land Rehabilitation