A review of the biology, stock structure, fisheries and status of wahoo (Acanthocybium solandri), with reference to the Pacific Ocean

Zischke, Mitchell T. (2012) A review of the biology, stock structure, fisheries and status of wahoo (Acanthocybium solandri), with reference to the Pacific Ocean. Fisheries Research, 119-120 : 13-22.


Author Zischke, Mitchell T.
Title A review of the biology, stock structure, fisheries and status of wahoo (Acanthocybium solandri), with reference to the Pacific Ocean
Formatted title A review of the biology, stock structure, fisheries and status of wahoo (Acanthocybium solandri), with reference to the Pacific Ocean
Journal name Fisheries Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0165-7836
1872-6763
Publication date 2012-05
Year available 2011
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1016/j.fishres.2011.11.026
Volume 119-120
Start page 13
End page 22
Total pages 10
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract The wahoo, Acanthocybium solandri (Cuvier), is a high trophic level predator in tropical and sub-tropical marine pelagic waters worldwide. Wahoo are primarily caught as a retained incidental catch in purse seine and pelagic longline fisheries that target tuna and swordfish. The global commercial catch of wahoo has increased in the Pacific Ocean from 130 t in 1993 to a peak in recent years of 1339 t in 2006. Wahoo are also a highly prized sportfish in recreational fisheries, and although catches are poorly understood, they may be higher than the commercial catch in some regions. Despite their commercial and recreational importance, little quantitative information exists on their biology and stock structure, particularly in the Pacific Ocean. This dearth of information may have significant consequences for stock assessments and management. Suggested research priorities for wahoo in the Pacific Ocean are to: (1) investigate their biology in the region, particularly age, growth and reproductive parameters, which are essential for stock assessment; (2) use holistic methods to determine stock structure on a timescale appropriate for assessment and management; (3) conduct quantitative diet analyses that may contribute to ecosystem models, and (4) quantify catch from recreational fisheries to include in estimates of total mortality.
Keyword Feeding ecology
Growth
Recreational fisheries
Reproduction
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Available online 13 December 2011

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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