Host-pathogen checkpoints and population bottlenecks in persistent and intracellular uropathogenic Escherichia coli bladder infection

Hannan, Thomas J., Totsika, Makrina, Mansfield, Kylie J., Moore, Kate H., Schembri, Mark A. and Hultgren, Scott J. (2012) Host-pathogen checkpoints and population bottlenecks in persistent and intracellular uropathogenic Escherichia coli bladder infection. FEMS Microbiology Reviews, 36 3: 616-648. doi:10.1111/j.1574-6976.2012.00339.x


Author Hannan, Thomas J.
Totsika, Makrina
Mansfield, Kylie J.
Moore, Kate H.
Schembri, Mark A.
Hultgren, Scott J.
Title Host-pathogen checkpoints and population bottlenecks in persistent and intracellular uropathogenic Escherichia coli bladder infection
Journal name FEMS Microbiology Reviews   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0168-6445
1574-6976
Publication date 2012-05-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1574-6976.2012.00339.x
Volume 36
Issue 3
Start page 616
End page 648
Total pages 33
Editor Christoph Dehio
Colin Berry
Ralf Bartenschlager
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Bladder infections affect millions of people yearly, and recurrent symptomatic infections (cystitis) are very common. The rapid increase in infections caused by multidrug-resistant uropathogens threatens to make recurrent cystitis an increasingly troubling public health concern. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) cause the vast majority of bladder infections. Upon entry into the lower urinary tract, UPEC face obstacles to colonization that constitute population bottlenecks, reducing diversity, and selecting for fit clones. A critical mucosal barrier to bladder infection is the epithelium (urothelium). UPEC bypass this barrier when they invade urothelial cells and form intracellular bacterial communities (IBCs), a process which requires type 1 pili. IBCs are transient in nature, occurring primarily during acute infection. Chronic bladder infection is common and can be either latent, in the form of the quiescent intracellular reservoir (QIR), or active, in the form of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB/ABU) or chronic cystitis. In mice, the fate of bladder infection, QIR, ASB, or chronic cystitis, is determined within the first 24 h of infection and constitutes a putative host–pathogen mucosal checkpoint that contributes to susceptibility to recurrent cystitis. Knowledge of these checkpoints and bottlenecks is critical for our understanding of bladder infection and efforts to devise novel therapeutic strategies.
Keyword Cystitis
Urinary tract infection
UPEC
Type 1 pili
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Special Issue: Intracellular Pathogens and Persistence

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
 
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Created: Thu, 26 Apr 2012, 18:28:09 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Chemistry & Molecular Biosciences