Culex annulirostris (Diptera: Culicidae) host feeding patterns and Japanese encephalitis virus ecology in Northern Australia

Hall-Mendelin, Sonja, Jansen, Cassie C., Cheah, Wai Yuen, Montgomery, Brian L., Hall, Roy A., Ritchie, Scott A. and Van den Hurk, Andrew F. (2012) Culex annulirostris (Diptera: Culicidae) host feeding patterns and Japanese encephalitis virus ecology in Northern Australia. Journal of Medical Entomology, 49 2: 371-377. doi:10.1603/ME11148


Author Hall-Mendelin, Sonja
Jansen, Cassie C.
Cheah, Wai Yuen
Montgomery, Brian L.
Hall, Roy A.
Ritchie, Scott A.
Van den Hurk, Andrew F.
Title Culex annulirostris (Diptera: Culicidae) host feeding patterns and Japanese encephalitis virus ecology in Northern Australia
Formatted title
Culex annulirostris (Diptera: Culicidae) host feeding patterns and Japanese encephalitis virus ecology in Northern Australia
Journal name Journal of Medical Entomology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-2585
1938-2928
Publication date 2012-03
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1603/ME11148
Volume 49
Issue 2
Start page 371
End page 377
Total pages 7
Place of publication Lanham, MD, United States
Publisher Entomological Society of America
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) transmission in northern Australia has, in the past, been facilitated by Culex annulirostris Skuse feeding on domestic pigs, the primary amplifying hosts of the virus. To further characterize mosquito feeding behavior in northern Australia, 1,128 bloodmeals from Cx. annulirostris were analyzed using a double-antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Overall, Cx. annulirostris obtained >94% of blood meals from mammals, comprising marsupials (37%), pigs (20%), dogs (16%), and cows (11%), although the proportion feeding on each of these host types varied between study locations. Where JEV activity was detected, feeding rates on pigs were relatively high. At the location that yielded the first Australian mainland isolate of JEV from mosquitoes, feral pigs (in the absence of domestic pigs) accounted for 82% of bloodmeals identified, representing the first occasion that feeding on feral pigs has been associated with JEV transmission in Australia. Interestingly, <3% of Cx. annulirostris had fed on pigs at locations on Badu Island where JEV was detected in multiple pools of mosquitoes in a concurrent study. This suggests that either alternative hosts, such as birds, which comprised 21% of blood meals identified, or infected mosquitoes immigrating from areas where domestic pigs are housed, may have contributed to transmission at this location. Because Cx. annulirostris is both an opportunistic feeder and the primary JEV vector in the region, environmental characteristics and host presence can determine JEV transmission dynamics in northern Australia.
Keyword Japanese encephalitis virus
Culex annulirostris
Host feeding pattern
Pig
Australia
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
 
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Created: Tue, 17 Apr 2012, 13:04:29 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Chemistry & Molecular Biosciences