A deeper level of ketamine anesthesia does not affect functional residual capacity and ventilation distribution in healthy preschool children

Von Ungern-Sternberg, Britta S., Regli, Adrian, Frei, Franz J., Ritz, Eva-Maria Jordi, Hammer, Jurg, Schibler, Andreas and Erb, Thomas O. (2007) A deeper level of ketamine anesthesia does not affect functional residual capacity and ventilation distribution in healthy preschool children. Pediatric Anesthesia, 17 12: 1150-1155.


Author Von Ungern-Sternberg, Britta S.
Regli, Adrian
Frei, Franz J.
Ritz, Eva-Maria Jordi
Hammer, Jurg
Schibler, Andreas
Erb, Thomas O.
Title A deeper level of ketamine anesthesia does not affect functional residual capacity and ventilation distribution in healthy preschool children
Journal name Pediatric Anesthesia   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1155-5645
1460-9592
Publication date 2007-12
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1460-9592.2007.02335.x
Volume 17
Issue 12
Start page 1150
End page 1155
Total pages 6
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Formatted abstract Background:  Ketamine is commonly used in children in the emergency setting and while undergoing diagnostic and therapeutic interventions because of its combination of hypnotic and analgesic properties. Although studies comparing various levels of ketamine anesthesia are lacking, previous work suggests that lung mechanics might only be minimally affected by ketamine.

Methods:  After approval from the Ethics Committee, anesthesia was induced with 2 mg·kg−1 racemic ketamine followed by a continuous infusion of ketamine 2 mg·kg−1 h−1 (level I) in 26 children (2–6 years of age), and after 5 min, the first set of measurements was performed. Then, a second bolus of ketamine 2 mg·kg−1 followed by ketamine 4 mg·kg−1 h−1 was administered (level II) and after 5 min, the second set of measurements was performed. Functional residual capacity (FRC) and lung clearance index (LCI) were calculated using a multibreath analysis by a blinded observer.

Results:  Functional residual capacity and LCI did not change between the two levels (FRC 25.6 [4.3] ml·kg−1 vs 25.5 [4.2] ml·kg−1, P = 0.769, LCI 10.5 [1.2] vs 10.3 [1.1], P = 0.403). The minute ventilation was similar between the two levels of anesthesia. The University of Michigan Sedation Scale increased from 3 (3) to 4 (3–4) at the second level of ketamine anesthesia.

Conclusions:
  A deeper level of anesthesia induced by ketamine does not affect FRC, ventilation distribution or minute ventilation suggesting that the depth of ketamine anesthesia has a minimal effect on pulmonary function.
Keyword Anesthetized paralyzed children
Ultrasonic flow meter
Airway closure
Young children
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
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