Blue-ringed octopus (Hapalochlaena sp.) envenomation of a 4-year-old boy: a case report

Cavazzoni, Elena, Lister, Bruce, Sargent, Phillip and Schibler, Andreas (2008) Blue-ringed octopus (Hapalochlaena sp.) envenomation of a 4-year-old boy: a case report. Clinical Toxicology, 46 8: 760-761. doi:10.1080/15563650701601790


Author Cavazzoni, Elena
Lister, Bruce
Sargent, Phillip
Schibler, Andreas
Title Blue-ringed octopus (Hapalochlaena sp.) envenomation of a 4-year-old boy: a case report
Formatted title
Blue-ringed octopus (Hapalochlaena sp.) envenomation of a 4-year-old boy: a case report
Journal name Clinical Toxicology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1556-3650
1556-9519
Publication date 2008-09
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/15563650701601790
Volume 46
Issue 8
Start page 760
End page 761
Total pages 2
Place of publication New York, United States
Publisher Informa Healthcare
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Introduction. The blue-ringed octopus (Hapalochlaena sp.) is a small animal, which can inject a toxin that produces a respiratory arrest within minutes. This envenomation is a rare occurrence with very few reported outcomes in children. Case report. A 4-year-old boy was bitten by a blue-ringed octopus (Hapalochlaena sp.) whilst playing at a popular beach in Queensland, Australia. Within ten minutes of the bite, he had vomited three times, lost the ability to stand and complained of blurred vision. An ambulance was called by the time he presented to the local emergency department (20 minutes after the bite) he had acute and progressive skeletal muscle weakness. He was intubated, ventilated, and transferred to a pediatric intensive care unit for specialized supportive care. He was ventilated for a total of 17 hours with spontaneous muscular activity returning at around 15 hours from envenomation. Discussion. If not treated appropriately the bite of this small and innocuous looking animal could have lead to death within minutes. Conclusion. This case report serves as a reminder of how appropriate treatment can ensure discharge from hospital with no long-term consequences. It also highlights the importance of education for beach goers and in particular parents to prevent exposure of tetrodotoxin to children.
Keyword Emergency department
Pediatric
Toxins
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
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