Assessing rural landholders diversity in the Wet Tropics region of Queensland Australia in relation to natural resource management programs: a market segmentation approach

Emtage, Nicholas and Herbohn, John (2012) Assessing rural landholders diversity in the Wet Tropics region of Queensland Australia in relation to natural resource management programs: a market segmentation approach. Agricultural Systems, 10 : 107-118.


Author Emtage, Nicholas
Herbohn, John
Title Assessing rural landholders diversity in the Wet Tropics region of Queensland Australia in relation to natural resource management programs: a market segmentation approach
Journal name Agricultural Systems   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0308-521X
1873-2267
Publication date 2012-07
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.agsy.2012.03.013
Volume 10
Start page 107
End page 118
Total pages 12
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Abstract Government agencies in many countries are encouraging rural landholders to improve their land management practices in order to improve the health of the natural environment. The level of adoption of improved practices by landholders is, however, highly variable. Understanding the diversity of rural landholders is an important step in increasing the uptake of improved land management practices. In this study, we investigate the factors that influence landholders to adopt recommended practices and use this to provide insights into how to encourage greater adoption of these practices. A mail based survey of rural landholders in the Wet Tropics region of north eastern Australia was used to gather data. Adapting a ‘prime prospects analysis’ approach used in social marketing, we used this data to develop a typology of landholders based on their attitudes to environmental health and adoption of currently recommended practices in agriculture. Five landholder types were identified: the ‘concerned but unengaged’ who are interested but not engaged in using best management practices (BMPs); the ‘multiple objective’ landholders with moderate levels of interest in natural resource management (NRM) and engagement activities; the ‘production orientated’ landholders who are engaged in the use of BMPs but not greatly concerned about NRM issues; the ‘disconnected and conservative’ landholders who have low levels of interest in or engagement with NRM activities; and the ‘well-connected and progressive’ who are highly motivated and engaged in using BMPs. Profiles of the groups were developed through examining differences in their management objectives, trust in others, communication behaviour and management practices of the group members. Each of the groups will require different strategies to encourage adoption of recommended management practices including a mix of information campaigns, training and incentive programs provided by varying organisations that have the trust of landholders. While some types of landholders will be best targeted through industry associations, many of these landholders have already adopted many of the recommended practices. Other types of landholders have little contact or affinity with these associations and would be better served by other types of organisations and separate communication strategies that better match their management aspirations and circumstances.
Keyword Farmer typology
Market segmentation
Cluster analysis
Water quality
Natural resource management
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Available online 27 April 2012.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
Official 2013 Collection
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 2 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 3 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 33 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 10 Apr 2012, 08:18:17 EST by Dr John Herbohn on behalf of School of Agriculture and Food Sciences