Effect of environmental conditions on degree of hoof wall hydration in horses

Hampson, Brian A., de Laat, Melody A., Mills, Paul C. and Pollitt, Chris C. (2012) Effect of environmental conditions on degree of hoof wall hydration in horses. American Journal of Veterinary Research, 73 3: 435-438. doi:10.2460/ajvr.73.3.435


Author Hampson, Brian A.
de Laat, Melody A.
Mills, Paul C.
Pollitt, Chris C.
Title Effect of environmental conditions on degree of hoof wall hydration in horses
Journal name American Journal of Veterinary Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0002-9645
1943-5681
Publication date 2012-03
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.2460/ajvr.73.3.435
Volume 73
Issue 3
Start page 435
End page 438
Total pages 4
Place of publication Schaumburg, IL, United States
Publisher American Veterinary Medical Association
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective—To determine the effect of various environmental conditions on the degree of hydration in hoof wall horn tissue from feral horses and investigate the effect of short-term foot soaking on moisture content in hoof wall and sole tissue in domestic horses.
Animals—40 feral horses from 3 environments (wet and boggy [n = 10], partially flooded [20], and constantly dry desert [10]) and 6 nonferal Quarter Horses.
Procedures—The percentage of moisture content of hoof wall samples from feral horses was measured in vitro. In a separate evaluation, the percentage of moisture content of hoof wall and sole tissue was measured in the dry and soaked forefeet of Quarter Horses.
Results—Mean ± SD percentage of moisture content was 29.6 ± 5.1%, 29.5 ± 5.8%, and 29.5 ± 2.9% for feral horses from the wet and boggy, partially flooded, and constantly dry desert environments, respectively. Moisture content did not differ among the 3 groups, nor did it differ between dry and soaked hoof wall samples from nonferal horses. However, soaking in water for 2 hours resulted in a significant increase in the percentage of moisture content of the sole.
Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Environmental conditions do not appear to affect moisture content in the hoof wall horn. Soaking horses' feet regularly in water would be unlikely to change the degree of hydration in the hoof wall horn but may further hydrate the sole.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
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