Socio-demographic correlates of poor subjective sleep quality in a large cohort of middle-aged Australian women

Soltani, M., Hayatbakhsh, M. R. and Clavarino, A. (2011). Socio-demographic correlates of poor subjective sleep quality in a large cohort of middle-aged Australian women. In: Asian Federation of Psychiatric Associations, 3rd World Congress of Asian Psychiatry, Melbourme, Australia, (S77-S77). 31 July - 4 August 2011. doi:10.1016/S1876-2018(11)60297-9


Author Soltani, M.
Hayatbakhsh, M. R.
Clavarino, A.
Title of paper Socio-demographic correlates of poor subjective sleep quality in a large cohort of middle-aged Australian women
Conference name Asian Federation of Psychiatric Associations, 3rd World Congress of Asian Psychiatry
Conference location Melbourme, Australia
Conference dates 31 July - 4 August 2011
Journal name Asian Journal of Psychiatry   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Publication Year 2011
Sub-type Poster
DOI 10.1016/S1876-2018(11)60297-9
ISSN 1876-2018
1876-2026
Volume 4
Issue Suppl 1
Start page S77
End page S77
Total pages 1
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Aim: To determine the socio-demographic correlates of poor sleep quality in middle-aged Australian women.
Methods: For this cross-sectional study data on 3692 mothers were taken from the Mater-University of Queensland Study of Pregnancy (MUSP) at 21 year follow-up, a large birth cohort study of mothers and children enrolled in Brisbane, Australia beginning in 1981. Subjective sleep quality was assessed with the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Candidate socio-demographic correlates of poor sleep quality including age, employment status, ethnicity, marital status, level of education, children residing at home, level ofengagement in social networks and housing tenure were assessed. Correlates associated with poor sleep quality were included in subsequent multivariate logistic regression analyses.
Results: Unemployment, not living with a partner, lower level of education, non-house ownership, no children at home, poor social network and lower family income were found to be related to poorer sleep quality. After controlling for recent anxiety, depression and menopausal symptoms the association between these factors, excepting family income and poor sleep quality remained significant. Better sleep quality was associated with being employed, tertiary level of education, home ownership and good social networks.
Conclusion: The association of low family income with poor sleep quality may possibly be mediated by anxiety.
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
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Created: Thu, 05 Apr 2012, 11:19:12 EST by Dr. Mohammad Reza Hayatbakhsh on behalf of School of Public Health