Cross-sectional and longitudinal effects of aging for the secondary conditions of spinal cord injury

Coll, Joseph R. (2007) Cross-sectional and longitudinal effects of aging for the secondary conditions of spinal cord injury. Topics in Spinal Cord Injury Research, 12 3: 15-22. doi:10.1310/7484-4Q2H-7086-78V8


Author Coll, Joseph R.
Title Cross-sectional and longitudinal effects of aging for the secondary conditions of spinal cord injury
Journal name Topics in Spinal Cord Injury Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1082-0744
1945-5763
Publication date 2007
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1310/7484-4Q2H-7086-78V8
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 12
Issue 3
Start page 15
End page 22
Total pages 8
Place of publication St Louis, MO, United States
Publisher Thomas Land Publishers
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Purpose: This study evaluates the effects of aging and years post injury (YPI) of secondary conditions common in spinal cord injury (SCI). Method: Aging and YPI are parameterized into cross-sectional and longitudinal components to determine whether changes in a particular secondary condition over time are longitudinal in nature or could be modeled using a cross-sectional design. The study also evaluates whether changes in secondary conditions are more attributable to age or YPI and whether the relationship of age and YPI with the outcome is linear or nonlinear. Results: The longitudinal component of aging was the most associated with secondary conditions, indicating that regardless of age or YPI the risk of the secondary condition changed over time. For some conditions, the direction of change for the longitudinal components and crosssectional components was in the same direction, whereas for other conditions the cross-sectional effect was in the opposite direction of the longitudinal effect. Similarly some of the secondary conditions were more associated with cross-sectional age, whereas others were more associated with cross-sectional YPI. Examples of secondary conditions that have a nonlinear association with age and YPI are provided. Conclusion: The findings of this study suggest that longitudinal study designs are warranted as the crosssectional effects were not able to detect the effects of aging in predicting the risk of secondary conditions in SCI.
Keyword Aging
SCI
Study design
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes Winter 2007 - Effect of Aging on Individuals with Chronic SCI

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 05 Apr 2012, 10:51:16 EST by Joseph Coll on behalf of School of Public Health