An investigation on the effect of chrysotile shape and anisotropic properties on the rheology of chrysotile suspensions

Ndlovu, Bulelwa, Burdukova, E., Becker, M., Deglon, D., Franzidis, J- P. and Laskowski, J. S. (2010). An investigation on the effect of chrysotile shape and anisotropic properties on the rheology of chrysotile suspensions. In: XXV International Mineral Processing Congress Proceedings. XXV International Mineral Processing Congress (IMPC) 2010, Brisbane, Qld, Australia, (367-376). 6-10 September 2010.

Author Ndlovu, Bulelwa
Burdukova, E.
Becker, M.
Deglon, D.
Franzidis, J- P.
Laskowski, J. S.
Title of paper An investigation on the effect of chrysotile shape and anisotropic properties on the rheology of chrysotile suspensions
Conference name XXV International Mineral Processing Congress (IMPC) 2010
Conference location Brisbane, Qld, Australia
Conference dates 6-10 September 2010
Proceedings title XXV International Mineral Processing Congress Proceedings
Place of Publication Victoria, Australia
Publisher AusIMM: Australasian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy
Publication Year 2010
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 9781921522284
1921522283
Start page 367
End page 376
Total pages 10
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Chrysotile, a polymorph of serpentine, is a phyllosilicate mineral that occurs as a major gangue mineral in many ores (eg Mt Keith nickel sulfide ore, Western Australia). The rheological behaviour of chrysotile stems from two main factors: its distinctive morphology and its electrical surface charge. It is believed that these factors are central to the problematic rheological behaviour and low solids throughput typically experienced in the processing of such ores. In this work, a study of the effects of chrysotile surface charge properties and particle shape on the rheology of chrysotile suspensions was conducted.

It was found that the rheology of suspensions of pure chrysotile is characterised by extremely high yield stress values over a broad pH range (pH 4 to 11).The disparity in the point of zero charge and range of maximum yield stress for chrysotile is consistent with the anisotropic nature of chrysotile particles. A comparison of the rheological behaviour of quartz suspensions (non-fibrous) to that of chrysotile suspensions (fibrous) provides a practical indication of the effects of the fibrous nature of chrysotile relative to non-fibrous minerals. The long, thin fibres are easily entangled to form suspensions with much higher plastic viscosities and Bingham yield stresses than non-fibrous particles.

Chrysotile particle shape and surface charge are central to the rheology of chrysotile suspensions, although shape appears to play a more significant role in this regard.

This fundamental study would be beneficial to the ongoing research for improved recovery in the Mt Keith nickel sulfide ore as well as other chrysotile bearing ores
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown
Additional Notes Theme "Smarter processing for the future"

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Julius Kruttschnitt Mineral Research Centre Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 02 Apr 2012, 13:44:21 EST by Karen Holtham on behalf of Julius Kruttschnitt Mineral Research Centre