Abdominal muscle response to a simulated weight-bearing task by elite Australian Rules football players

Hyde, Jodie, Stanton, Warren R. and Hides, Julie A. (2012) Abdominal muscle response to a simulated weight-bearing task by elite Australian Rules football players. Human Movement Science, 31 1: 129-138. doi:10.1016/j.humov.2011.04.005


Author Hyde, Jodie
Stanton, Warren R.
Hides, Julie A.
Title Abdominal muscle response to a simulated weight-bearing task by elite Australian Rules football players
Journal name Human Movement Science   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0167-9457
1872-7646
Publication date 2012-02
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.humov.2011.04.005
Volume 31
Issue 1
Start page 129
End page 138
Total pages 10
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract The aim of this study was to examine the automatic recruitment of the deep abdominal muscles during a unilateral simulated weight-bearing task by elite Australian Rules football (AFL) players with and without low back pain (LBP). An observational cross-sectional study was conducted using ultrasound imaging to measure the thickness of the internal oblique (IO) and transversus abdominis (TrA) muscles. Thirty-seven elite male AFL players participated. Repeated measures factors included ‘force level’ (rest, 25% and 45% of body weight), ‘leg’ (dominant or non-dominant kicking leg) and ‘side’ (ultrasound side ipsilateral or contralateral to the leg used for the weight-bearing task). The dependent variables were thickness of the IO and TrA muscles. The results of this study showed that thickness of the IO (p < .0001) and TrA (p < .0001) muscles increased in response to ‘force level’. During the task, the thickness of the IO muscle on the contralateral side of the trunk relative to the leg being tested, increased more in participants with current LBP (p = .034). This pattern was more distinct on the non-dominant kicking leg. Altered abdominal muscle recruitment in elite athletes with low back pain may be an attempt by the central nervous system (CNS) to compensate for inadequate lumbo-pelvic stability.
Keyword Ultrasound Imaging (US)
Australian Football League (AFL)
Transversus abdominis muscle
Internal oblique muscle
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Available online 12 August 2011

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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