Chronic high-carbohydrate, high-fat feeding in rats induces reversible metabolic, cardiovascular, and liver changes

Poudyal, Hemant, Panchal, Sunil K., Ward, Leigh C., Waanders, Jennifer and Brown, Lindsay (2012) Chronic high-carbohydrate, high-fat feeding in rats induces reversible metabolic, cardiovascular, and liver changes. American Journal of Physiology: Endocrinology and Metabolism, 302 12: E1472-E1482. doi:10.1152/ajpendo.00102.2012

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Author Poudyal, Hemant
Panchal, Sunil K.
Ward, Leigh C.
Waanders, Jennifer
Brown, Lindsay
Title Chronic high-carbohydrate, high-fat feeding in rats induces reversible metabolic, cardiovascular, and liver changes
Journal name American Journal of Physiology: Endocrinology and Metabolism   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0193-1849
1522-1555
Publication date 2012-06
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1152/ajpendo.00102.2012
Volume 302
Issue 12
Start page E1472
End page E1482
Total pages 11
Editor Charles H. Lang
Place of publication Bethesda MD, U.S.A.
Publisher American Physiological Society
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Age-related physiological changes develop at the same time as the increase in metabolic syndrome in humans after young adulthood. There is a paucity of data in models mimicking chronic diet-induced changes in human middle age and interventions to reverse these changes. This study has measured the changes during chronic consumption of high-carbohydrate (as corn starch), low-fat (C) and high-carbohydrate (as fructose and sucrose), high-fat (H) diet in rats for 32 weeks. C feeding induced changes without metabolic syndrome such as disproportionate increases in total body lean and fat mass, reduced bone mineral content, cardiovascular remodeling with increased systolic blood pressure, left ventricular and arterial stiffness, and increased plasma markers of liver injury. H feeding induced visceral adiposity with reduced lean mass, increased lipid infiltration in the skeletal muscle, impaired glucose and insulin tolerance, cardiovascular remodeling, hepatic steatosis, and increased infiltration of inflammatory cells in the heart and the liver. Chia seed supplementation for 24 weeks attenuated most structural and functional modifications induced by either age or H diet including increased whole body lean mass and lipid redistribution away from the abdominal area, and normalized the chronic low-grade inflammation induced by H diet feeding; these effects may be mediated by increased metabolism of anti-inflammatory n-3 fatty acids from chia seed. These results suggest that chronic H feeding for 32 weeks mimics the diet-induced cardiovascular and metabolic changes in middle age and that chia seed may serve as an alternative dietary strategy in the management of these changes.
Keyword Obesity
Chia seed
Omega-3 fatty acids
Metabolic syndrome
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Mon, 26 Mar 2012, 14:47:32 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Biomedical Sciences