Trends in malaria research in 11 Asian Pacific countries: an analysis of peer-reviewed publications over two decades

Andersen, Finn, Douglas, Nick M., Bustos, Dorina, Galappaththy, Gawarie, Qi, Gao, Hsiang, Michelle S., Kusriastuti, Rita, Mendis, Kamini, Taleo, George, Whittaker, Maxine, Price, Ric N. and von Seidlein, Lorenz (2011) Trends in malaria research in 11 Asian Pacific countries: an analysis of peer-reviewed publications over two decades. Malaria Journal, 10 Article number 131: . doi:10.1186/1475-2875-10-131


Author Andersen, Finn
Douglas, Nick M.
Bustos, Dorina
Galappaththy, Gawarie
Qi, Gao
Hsiang, Michelle S.
Kusriastuti, Rita
Mendis, Kamini
Taleo, George
Whittaker, Maxine
Price, Ric N.
von Seidlein, Lorenz
Title Trends in malaria research in 11 Asian Pacific countries: an analysis of peer-reviewed publications over two decades
Journal name Malaria Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1475-2875
Publication date 2011-05
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1186/1475-2875-10-131
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 10
Issue Article number 131
Total pages 7
Place of publication London, England, U.K.
Publisher BioMed Central
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background
Quantitative data are lacking on published malaria research. The purpose of the study is to characterize trends in malaria-related literature from 1990 to 2009 in 11 Asian-Pacific countries that are committed to malaria elimination as a national goal.
Methods
A systematic search was conducted for articles published from January 1990 to December 2009 in PubMed/MEDLINE using terms for malaria and 11 target countries (Bhutan, China, North Korea, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Solomon Islands, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Vanuatu). The references were collated and categorized according to subject, Plasmodium species, and whether they contained original or derivative data.
Results
2,700 articles published between 1990 and 2009 related to malaria in the target countries. The annual output of malaria-related papers increased linearly whereas the overall biomedical output from these countries grew exponentially. The percentage of malaria-related publications was nearly 3% (111/3741) of all biomedical publications in 1992 and decreased to less than 1% (118/12171; p < 0.001) in 2009. Thailand had the highest absolute output of malaria-related papers (n = 1211), followed by China (n = 609) and Indonesia (n = 346). Solomon Islands and Vanuatu had lower absolute numbers of publications, but both countries had the highest number of publications per capita (1.3 and 2.5 papers/1,000 population). The largest percentage of papers concerned the epidemiology and control of malaria (53%) followed by studies of drugs and drug resistance (47%). There was an increase in the proportion of articles relating to epidemiology, entomology, biology, molecular biology, pathophysiology and diagnostics from the first to the second decade, whereas the percentage of papers on drugs, clinical aspects of malaria, immunology, and social sciences decreased.
Conclusions
The proportion of malaria-related publications out of the overall biomedical output from the 11 target Asian-Pacific countries is decreasing. The discovery and evaluation of new, safe and effective drugs and vaccines is paramount. In addition the elimination of malaria will require operational research to implement and scale up interventions.
Keyword Plasmodium-falciparum Transmission
Artemisinin Resistance
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Australian Centre for International & Tropical Health
Official 2012 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 23 Mar 2012, 11:13:03 EST by Geraldine Fitzgerald on behalf of School of Public Health