Blaming, praising and protecting our humanity: The implications of everyday dehumanization for judgments of moral status

Bastian, Brock, Laham, Simon, Wilson, Sam, Haslam, Nick and Koval, Peter (2011) Blaming, praising and protecting our humanity: The implications of everyday dehumanization for judgments of moral status. British Journal of Social Psychology, 50 3: 469-483. doi:10.1348/014466610X521383


Author Bastian, Brock
Laham, Simon
Wilson, Sam
Haslam, Nick
Koval, Peter
Title Blaming, praising and protecting our humanity: The implications of everyday dehumanization for judgments of moral status
Journal name British Journal of Social Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0144-6665
2044-8309
Publication date 2011-09
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1348/014466610X521383
Volume 50
Issue 3
Start page 469
End page 483
Total pages 15
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher John Wiley and Sons
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Abstract Being human implies a particular moral status: having moral value, agency, and responsibility. However, people are not seen as equally human. Across two studies, we examine the consequences that subtle variations in the perceived humanness of actors or groups have for their perceived moral status. Drawing on Haslam’s twodimensional model of humanness and focusing on three ways people may be considered to have moral status – moral patiency (value), agency, or responsibility – we demonstrate that subtly denying humanness to others has implications for whether they are blamed, praised, or considered worthy of moral concern and rehabilitation. Moreover, we show that distinct human characteristics are linked to specific judgments of moral status. This work demonstrates that everyday judgments of moral status are influenced by perceptions of humanness.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 22 Mar 2012, 16:33:03 EST by Mrs Alison Pike on behalf of School of Psychology