Does household composition explain welfare regime poverty risks for older adults and other household members?

Tsui-O Tai and Treas, Judith (2009) Does household composition explain welfare regime poverty risks for older adults and other household members?. Journal of Gerontology Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences, 64B 6: 777-787. doi:10.1093/geronb/gbp039


Author Tsui-O Tai
Treas, Judith
Title Does household composition explain welfare regime poverty risks for older adults and other household members?
Journal name Journal of Gerontology Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1079-5014
1758-5368
Publication date 2009-11
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/geronb/gbp039
Volume 64B
Issue 6
Start page 777
End page 787
Total pages 11
Place of publication Cary, NC, United States
Publisher Oxford University Press
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objectives: This cross-national study examines the poverty of older adults and their household members and relates the risk of poverty to macrolevel state approaches to welfare as well as to microlevel composition of households.
Methods: Data on individuals in households with older adults for 22 countries come from the Luxembourg Income Survey. Robust cluster analysis relates the risk of poverty to the type of state welfare regime; the characteristics of the household head (age, gender, marital status, and education); as well as the household's numbers of earners, older adults, and children.
Results: Persons in households with older adults are significantly less likely to be poor in countries with social democratic and conservative welfare regimes than in Taiwan, an exemplar of limited social welfare programs. Controlling for country differences in household composition increases the differences in poverty risks. Living with fewer children, more older adults, and more earners lowers the risk of poverty, as does having a married and better educated household head.
Discussion: Countries with more generous social welfare provisions have lower risks of poverty despite having household characteristics that are comparatively unfavorable. As Taiwan demonstrates, household composition, particularly a reliance on multigenerational households, compensates for limited state welfare programs.
Keyword Elderly poverty
Household composition
Multigenerational coresidence
Social security
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Institute for Social Science Research - Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 22 Mar 2012, 14:50:18 EST by Tsui-o Tai on behalf of ISSR - Research Groups