Short report: Management of chronic strongyloidiasis in immigrants and refugees: is serologic testing useful?

Biggs, Beverley-Ann, Caruana, Sonia, Mihrshahi, Seema, Jolley, Damien, Leydon, Jenne, Chea, Ley and Nuon, Sophy (2009) Short report: Management of chronic strongyloidiasis in immigrants and refugees: is serologic testing useful?. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 80 5: 788-791.

Author Biggs, Beverley-Ann
Caruana, Sonia
Mihrshahi, Seema
Jolley, Damien
Leydon, Jenne
Chea, Ley
Nuon, Sophy
Title Short report: Management of chronic strongyloidiasis in immigrants and refugees: is serologic testing useful?
Journal name American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0002-9637
1476-1645
Publication date 2009-05-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 80
Issue 5
Start page 788
End page 791
Total pages 4
Place of publication Deerfield, IL, United States
Publisher American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Language eng
Abstract We assessed the usefulness of serologic testing in monitoring strongyloidiasis in immigrants after treatment with two doses of ivermectin. An observational study was conducted in a group of Cambodian immigrants residing in Melbourne who were treated for strongyloidiasis and followed-up in a general practice setting. Two doses of ivermectin (200 μg/kg) were administered orally. Periodic serologic enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay testing was undertaken for up to 30 months after treatment. Antibody titers for Strongyloides sp. decreased in 95% (38 of 40) of the patients, 47.5% (19 of 40) had a decrease in optical density to less than 0.5, and 65% (26 of 40) reached levels consistent with a cure during the follow-up period. Serologic testing for Strongyloides sp. is a useful tool for monitoring a decrease in antibody levels after effective treatment. This testing should be carried out 6-12 months after treatment to ensure a sustained downward trend suggestive of cure. Copyright ©2009 by The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Public Health Publications
 
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