The relationship between self-reported animal fear and ERP modulation: Evidence for enhanced processing and fear of harmless invertebrates in snake- and spider-fearful individuals

Mallan, Kimberley M. and Lipp, Ottmar V. (2011) The relationship between self-reported animal fear and ERP modulation: Evidence for enhanced processing and fear of harmless invertebrates in snake- and spider-fearful individuals. Motivation and Emotion, 35 4: 474-483. doi:10.1007/s11031-011-9218-9


Author Mallan, Kimberley M.
Lipp, Ottmar V.
Title The relationship between self-reported animal fear and ERP modulation: Evidence for enhanced processing and fear of harmless invertebrates in snake- and spider-fearful individuals
Journal name Motivation and Emotion   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0146-7239
1573-6644
Publication date 2011-12
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s11031-011-9218-9
Volume 35
Issue 4
Start page 474
End page 483
Total pages 10
Place of publication New York, NY, U.S A.
Publisher Springer
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The present study used ERPs to compare processing of fear-relevant (FR) animals (snakes and spiders) and non-fear-relevant (NFR) animals similar in appearance (worms and beetles). EEG was recorded from 18 undergraduate participants (10 females) as they completed two animal-viewing tasks that required simple categorization decisions. Participants were divided on a post hoc basis into low snake/spider fear and high snake/spider fear groups. Overall, FR animals were rated higher on fear and elicited a larger LPC. However, individual differences qualified these effects. Participants in the low fear group showed clear differentiation between FR and NFR animals on subjective ratings of fear and LPC modulation. In contrast, participants in the high fear group did not show such differentiation between FR and NFR animals. These findings suggest that the salience of feared-FR animals may generalize on both a behavioural and electro-cortical level to other animals of similar appearance but of a non-harmful nature.
Keyword Fear
Fear relevance
Event-related brain potentials
Generalization
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 18 Mar 2012, 12:50:39 EST by Mrs Alison Pike on behalf of School of Psychology