Trends in oral, pharyngeal and oesophageal cancer mortality in Australia: The comparative importance of tobacco, alcohol and other risk factors

Adair, Tim, Hoy, Damian, Dettrick, Zoe and Lopez, Alan D. (2011) Trends in oral, pharyngeal and oesophageal cancer mortality in Australia: The comparative importance of tobacco, alcohol and other risk factors. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health., 35 3: 212-219. doi:10.1111/j.1753-6405.2011.00700.x


Author Adair, Tim
Hoy, Damian
Dettrick, Zoe
Lopez, Alan D.
Title Trends in oral, pharyngeal and oesophageal cancer mortality in Australia: The comparative importance of tobacco, alcohol and other risk factors
Journal name Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health.   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1326-0200
1753-6405
Publication date 2011-06
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1753-6405.2011.00700.x
Volume 35
Issue 3
Start page 212
End page 219
Total pages 8
Place of publication Richmond, VIC, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: The relationship of long-term population-level trends in oral, pharyngeal and oesophageal cancer mortality with major risk factors such as tobacco consumption have not been statistically analysed in Australia. We have demonstrated the long-term implications using historical data.

Methods: Estimated age and sex-specific tobacco consumption back-extrapolated to 1887 were used together with alcohol and fruit and vegetable consumption data to examine their association with trends in oral, pharyngeal and oesophageal cancer mortality. Log-linear Poisson regression models were applied to specify the relationship with oesophageal and pharyngeal mortality data.

Results: Oral cancer mortality for males decreased sharply in the first half of the 20th Century in contrast to steadily rising tobacco consumption. Female oral and pharyngeal cancer remained steady at low levels. Post-World War II male and female oesophageal and male pharyngeal cancer mortality rose, then either fell or stabilised, without a clear relationship with risk factors.

Conclusions: Tobacco and alcohol consumption have influenced post-World War II trends in oral, pharyngeal and oesophageal cancer mortality. However, the challenges in using historical population level data prevent precise interpretation of findings.

Implications: There is increased exposure to risk factors for these cancers in many low- and middle-income countries. In particular, smoking cessation programs are needed to prevent increases in mortality from these cancers in such countries.
Keyword Oral cancer
Pharyngeal cancer
Oesophageal Cancer
Mortality
Tobacco smoking
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 16 Mar 2012, 13:15:20 EST by Geraldine Fitzgerald on behalf of School of Public Health