Mapping spatial tourism clusters: a case study of Victoria, Australia

Chhetri, Anjali, Arrowsmith, Colin, Chhetri, Prem and Corcoran, Jonathan (2012). Mapping spatial tourism clusters: a case study of Victoria, Australia. In: Clare Lade and Lisa Melsen, CAUTHE 2012: The new golden age of tourism and hospitality; Book 1; Proceedings of the 22nd Annual Conference. 22nd Annual CAUTHE Conference 2012, Melbourne, Australia, (133-151). 6-9 February 2012.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Chhetri, Anjali
Arrowsmith, Colin
Chhetri, Prem
Corcoran, Jonathan
Title of paper Mapping spatial tourism clusters: a case study of Victoria, Australia
Conference name 22nd Annual CAUTHE Conference 2012
Conference location Melbourne, Australia
Conference dates 6-9 February 2012
Proceedings title CAUTHE 2012: The new golden age of tourism and hospitality; Book 1; Proceedings of the 22nd Annual Conference
Place of Publication Melbourne, Australia
Publisher CAUTHE
Publication Year 2012
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 9780987050717
Editor Clare Lade
Lisa Melsen
Start page 133
End page 151
Total pages 19
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Using cluster theory as a theoretical framework, this paper specifically answers three interrelated research questions: i) what industries typically represent the tourism and hospitality sector; ii) what broader ‘functions’ does the sector perform; and iii) are these tourism and hospitality industries clustered around certain locations? Results show that the employment in the tourism and hospitality sector to total employment in Australia for 2006 is 7.74 percent. ‘Cafes and Restaurants’ (22 percent) is the largest employer of tourism and hospitality labour force, followed closely by ‘Takeaway Food Services’ (20 percent) and ‘Accommodation’ (16 percent). ‘Tourism Operational Services’; ‘Hospitality Services’; ‘Entertainment Services’; and ‘Infrastructure Operational Facilities Services’ are identified as four broad functions, which suggests a tendency of functional clustering. Measures of spatial autocorrelation show five distinct spatial tourism clusters in Victoria with a potential to foster inter-firm collaboration and sharing of pooled resources within the same value chain.
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Fri, 16 Mar 2012, 09:24:10 EST by Alexandra Simmonds on behalf of School of Geography, Planning & Env Management