Reframing the 'refugee experience': The case of African youth in Brisbane

Skrbis, Zlatko and Chiment, Melinda (2011). Reframing the 'refugee experience': The case of African youth in Brisbane. In: Steven Threadgold, Emma Kirby and John Germnov, Local Lives/Global Networks: The Australian Sociological Association Conference. Refereed Proceedings. The Annual Conference of the Australian Sociological Association (TASA, 2011), Newcastle, Australia, (). 28 November-1 December 2011.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Skrbis, Zlatko
Chiment, Melinda
Title of paper Reframing the 'refugee experience': The case of African youth in Brisbane
Conference name The Annual Conference of the Australian Sociological Association (TASA, 2011)
Conference location Newcastle, Australia
Conference dates 28 November-1 December 2011
Convener TASA (The Australian Sociological Association)
Proceedings title Local Lives/Global Networks: The Australian Sociological Association Conference. Refereed Proceedings
Place of Publication Canberra, Australia
Publisher Australian Sociological Association
Publication Year 2011
Sub-type Fully published paper
Open Access Status
ISBN 9780646567792
Editor Steven Threadgold
Emma Kirby
John Germnov
Total pages 19
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Much of the existing research on refugee resettlement describes young refugees as victims and passive “by-products” of the hardships endured during the pre-settlement phase. The resulting policy and programs that such framing informs tend to adopt resettlement strategies using a ‘deficit model’. The ‘refugee experience’, the model argues, produces young people defined by the lack of social and practical resources necessary for successful resettlement. This paper expands on a growing body of research which suggests that young refugees, contrary to common assumptions of the deficit model, use pre-settlement experiences to accumulate social and practical resources which they can deploy and utilise upon settlement. Using data from 30 in-depth interviews with young African refugees in Brisbane, our findings illustrate how skills developed in the refugee camp become a critical resource in preparing young refugees, albeit within a different context, to meet settlement challenges in Australia. The paper concludes with a brief discussion on research and policy implications; specifically, how researchers and policy makers may reframe the understanding of the ‘refugee experience.’
Keyword Refugee youth
Settlement
Integration
Australia
Policy
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Presented during Concurrent Session 1 "Migration, Ethnicity & Multiculturalism".

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Social Science Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 13 Mar 2012, 09:34:42 EST by Debbie Lim on behalf of School of Social Science