The Twitter revolution? Social media, representation and crisis in Iran and Libya

Duncombe, Constance (2011). The Twitter revolution? Social media, representation and crisis in Iran and Libya. In: Full Papers: Australian Political Science Association Conference 2011. Australian Political Science Association Conference (APSA) 2011, Canberra, Australia, (1-12). 26-28 September 2011.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Duncombe, Constance
Title of paper The Twitter revolution? Social media, representation and crisis in Iran and Libya
Language of Title eng
Conference name Australian Political Science Association Conference (APSA) 2011
Conference location Canberra, Australia
Conference dates 26-28 September 2011
Proceedings title Full Papers: Australian Political Science Association Conference 2011
Place of Publication Canberra, Australia
Publisher Australian National University, School of Politics and International Relations
Publication Year 2011
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 9780646564609
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Abstract/Summary This paper delves into the emergence of information communication technology (ICT) products such as YouTube, Facebook, Twitter and weblogs as part of the growth in social media networks, and the role this has to play in the maintenance of the hegemonic discourse of enlightened West/subordinate non-West. Using Western media coverage of the events surrounding the 2009 Green Movement protests in Iran and the 2011 anti-Gaddafi protests in Libya, and in particular reports that refer specifically to or actually use non-Western ICT products (such as Twitter or weblog excerpts, Facebook posts, and YouTube videos made by Iranians or Libyans), this paper will hopefully offer a more substantial conception of how these schemas of cultural representation are still evident within a supposedly egalitarian medium. This paper begins by outlining the methods undertaken in its construction, followed by an examination of the changes in news media as a result of ICT, and what impact this has had on the proliferation of civil society networks. This is followed by an exploration of the material representational schemas inherent in ICT, which is complemented by an examination of the cultural representations evident in Western media reports involving non-Western ICT use. [Introduction]
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Conference theme: Crisis, Uncertainty and Democracy

 
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Created: Mon, 12 Mar 2012, 09:59:00 EST by Elmari Louise Whyte on behalf of School of Political Science & Internat'l Studies