Proximal renal tubulopathy in dogs exposed to a common dried chicken treat: A retrospective study of 99 cases (2007-2009)

Thompson, M. F., Fleeman, L. M., Arteaga, A., Thompson, A. L., Wimpole, J., Reeves, M. P. and Campbell, S. J. (2009). Proximal renal tubulopathy in dogs exposed to a common dried chicken treat: A retrospective study of 99 cases (2007-2009). In: Science Week Proceedings: Small Animal Medicine Research Abstracts. Australian and New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists Science Week, Surfers Paradise, Gold Coast, Australia, (). 2-4 July 2009.

Author Thompson, M. F.
Fleeman, L. M.
Arteaga, A.
Thompson, A. L.
Wimpole, J.
Reeves, M. P.
Campbell, S. J.
Title of paper Proximal renal tubulopathy in dogs exposed to a common dried chicken treat: A retrospective study of 99 cases (2007-2009)
Language of Title eng
Conference name Australian and New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists Science Week
Conference location Surfers Paradise, Gold Coast, Australia
Conference dates 2-4 July 2009
Proceedings title Science Week Proceedings: Small Animal Medicine Research Abstracts
Language of Proceedings Title eng
Language of Journal Name eng
Place of Publication Brisbane, Qld, Australia
Publisher ANZCVS
Publication Year 2009
Sub-type Published abstract
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Background: Proximal renal tubulopathy, rarely reported in dogs, was documented in Australian dogs with
markedly increased frequency from August 2007.
Methods: Following a nation-wide call, cases were identified by direct communication with the veterinarian.
Selection criteria were glucosuria with blood glucose <9 mmol/L. Data collected included signalment,
presenting signs, history of feeding treats, results of urinalysis and blood tests, treatment and time to resolution
of clinical signs.
Results: 99 affected dogs were identified. All were fed one brand of dried chicken treats for a median of 12
weeks (range 0.3-78 weeks). Small breeds (<10kg) accounted for 87% of cases. Common presenting signs
included polyuria/polydipsia (70%), lethargy (70%), inappetence (62%) and vomiting (51%). Fractional
excretion of electrolytes (n=4) and urinary amino acid profiles (n=4) were abnormal in all cases tested. Common
biochemical findings included euglycaemia (73%; 67/92), hypoglycaemia (24%; 22/92), acidosis (77%; 20/26),
hypokalaemia (47%; 36/77) and azotaemia (29%; 24/84). In addition to discontinuation of treats, 63 dogs
received treatment including intravenous fluids (57%) and oral electrolyte, amino acid or vitamin supplements
(43%). Five dogs died or were euthanased. Severely affected dogs required intensive supportive care (> 2 weeks
in two patients). Time to resolution of clinical signs was <2 weeks (n=8), 2-4 weeks (n=12), 5-7 weeks (n=5)
and 2-6 months (n=10). Treatment is ongoing for many dogs.
Conclusion: 99 cases of proximal renal tubulopathy syndrome were documented over a 17-month period. Most
dogs survived but many required aggressive supportive care in addition to withdrawal of dried chicken treats. It
is likely that the treats contained a toxin targeting the proximal renal tubules.
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 08 Mar 2012, 14:46:54 EST by Ms Mary Thompson on behalf of School of Veterinary Science