Responses to graded replacement of urea by maize steep liquor in diets for intensively fed lambs for meat production

Nisa, Mahr-un-, Shahzad, Muhammad A., Phillips, Clive J. C. and Sarwar, Muhammad (2012) Responses to graded replacement of urea by maize steep liquor in diets for intensively fed lambs for meat production. Tropical Animal Health and Production, 44 5: 947-952. doi:10.1007/s11250-011-9991-1


Author Nisa, Mahr-un-
Shahzad, Muhammad A.
Phillips, Clive J. C.
Sarwar, Muhammad
Title Responses to graded replacement of urea by maize steep liquor in diets for intensively fed lambs for meat production
Journal name Tropical Animal Health and Production   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0049-4747
1573-7438
Publication date 2012-06
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s11250-011-9991-1
Volume 44
Issue 5
Start page 947
End page 952
Total pages 6
Place of publication Dordrecht, Netherlands
Publisher Springer
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Abstract rea is a common ingredient of the diets of intensively fed lambs, but is increasingly required for industrial processes. Maize steep liquor (MSL) is a by-product of maize grain degradation to produce starch that may be a suitable replacement. Fifty growing lambs were fed on equinitrogenous diets in which between 0% and 80% of the urea was replaced by MSL; their growth and metabolism were recorded over 70 days. Increasing replacement of urea by MSL increased feed intake and nutrient digestibilities, leading to increased growth rates, more efficient feed conversion, and increased nitrogen retention. Concentrations of triiodothyroxin, thyroxin, glucose, and methionine were increased by replacement of urea by liquor, and plasma urea was reduced. This study suggests that MSL is a suitable replacement for up to 80% of urea in the diet of rapidly growing lambs.
Keyword Maize steep liquor
Urea
Nutrient utilization
Biological response
Lambs
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article published online ahead of print November 18, 2011.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 07 Mar 2012, 14:49:08 EST by Annette Winter on behalf of School of Veterinary Science