Suicidal behaviours in adolescents in Nova Scotia, Canada: protective associations with measures of social capital

Langille, Donald B., Asbridge, Mark, Kisely, Steve and Rasic, Daniel (2012) Suicidal behaviours in adolescents in Nova Scotia, Canada: protective associations with measures of social capital. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 47 10: 1549-1555. doi:10.1007/s00127-011-0461-x


Author Langille, Donald B.
Asbridge, Mark
Kisely, Steve
Rasic, Daniel
Title Suicidal behaviours in adolescents in Nova Scotia, Canada: protective associations with measures of social capital
Journal name Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0933-7954
1433-9285
Publication date 2012-10
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00127-011-0461-x
Volume 47
Issue 10
Start page 1549
End page 1555
Total pages 7
Place of publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publisher Springer
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Purpose Few studies of adolescent suicidality have examined its associations with social capital. We explored associations of measures of individual level social capital with self-reported suicide ideation and suicide attempt in adolescents in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, Canada, controlling for other factors known to be associated with adolescent suicidality.
Methods We surveyed 1,597 grade 10–12 students at three high schools in 2006 using self-completion questionnaires. Both sexes were combined for analysis. Outcome measures were suicidal ideation and attempt in the previous year. Measures of social capital included perceptions of trustworthiness and helpfulness of others at school, frequency of religious attendance and participation in extracurricular activities. Logistic regressions were carried out to determine associations of social capital with suicidality while controlling for other factors.
Results Perceived trustworthiness and helpfulness were protective for suicidal ideation and suicide attempt in the previous year. In adjusted analyses, there were interactions of gender and social capital—females reporting more social capital were more protected from suicide attempt relative to males with similar levels of social capital.
Conclusions This study provides initial evidence of protective associations of individual level social capital with adolescent suicidality. Our findings suggest that among adolescents low social capital as measured by perceptions of trust and helpfulness of others at school may be a warning sign for suicidality, particularly for females. It may be helpful to inquire of young people how they perceive the trustworthiness and helpfulness of their school environment as a measure of how supportive that environment might be to them when they are facing challenges to their mental health.
Keyword Sexual orientation
Adolescent
Suicidality
Social capital
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Online First. Published online: 27 December 2011.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 06 Mar 2012, 14:06:58 EST by Geraldine Fitzgerald on behalf of School of Public Health