Eliciting expert knowledge in conservation science

Martin, Tara G., Burgman, Mark A., Fidler, Fiona, Kuhnert, Petra M., Low-Choy, Samantha, Mcbride, Marissa and Mengersen, Kerrie (2012) Eliciting expert knowledge in conservation science. Conservation Biology, 26 1: 29-38. doi:10.1111/j.1523-1739.2011.01806.x


Author Martin, Tara G.
Burgman, Mark A.
Fidler, Fiona
Kuhnert, Petra M.
Low-Choy, Samantha
Mcbride, Marissa
Mengersen, Kerrie
Title Eliciting expert knowledge in conservation science
Journal name Conservation Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0888-8892
1523-1739
Publication date 2012-02
Year available 2011
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1111/j.1523-1739.2011.01806.x
Volume 26
Issue 1
Start page 29
End page 38
Total pages 10
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ, United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Abstract Expert knowledge is used widely in the science and practice of conservation because of the complexity of problems, relative lack of data, and the imminent nature of many conservation decisions. Expert knowledge is substantive information on a particular topic that is not widely known by others. An expert is someone who holds this knowledge and who is often deferred to in its interpretation. We refer to predictions by experts of what may happen in a particular context as expert judgments. In general, an expert-elicitation approach consists of five steps: deciding how information will be used, determining what to elicit, designing the elicitation process, performing the elicitation, and translating the elicited information into quantitative statements that can be used in a model or directly to make decisions. This last step is known as encoding. Some of the considerations in eliciting expert knowledge include determining how to work with multiple experts and how to combine multiple judgments, minimizing bias in the elicited information, and verifying the accuracy of expert information. We highlight structured elicitation techniques that, if adopted, will improve the accuracy and information content of expert judgment and ensure uncertainty is captured accurately. We suggest four aspects of an expert elicitation exercise be examined to determine its comprehensiveness and effectiveness: study design and context, elicitation design, elicitation method, and elicitation output. Just as the reliability of empirical data depends on the rigor with which it was acquired so too does that of expert knowledge.
Keyword Bayesian priors
Bias
Decision making
Elicitation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes © 2011 Australian Governmemt Conservation Biology. © 2011 Society for Conservation Biology.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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