Evidencing learning standards in science: Graduate perceptions of gaining knowledge and skills at two research-intensive universities

Matthews, Kelly and Hodgson, Yvonne (2011). Evidencing learning standards in science: Graduate perceptions of gaining knowledge and skills at two research-intensive universities. In: Manjula Sharma, Alexandra Yeung, Trisha Jenkins, Elizabeth Johnson, Gerry Rayner and Jan West, Proceedings of the Australian Conference on Science and Mathematics Education 2011. Australian Conference on Science and Mathematics Education 2011, Melbourne, Australia, (114-120). 28-30 September 2011.

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Author Matthews, Kelly
Hodgson, Yvonne
Title of paper Evidencing learning standards in science: Graduate perceptions of gaining knowledge and skills at two research-intensive universities
Language of Title eng
Conference name Australian Conference on Science and Mathematics Education 2011
Conference location Melbourne, Australia
Conference dates 28-30 September 2011
Proceedings title Proceedings of the Australian Conference on Science and Mathematics Education 2011
Language of Proceedings Title eng
Language of Journal Name eng
Place of Publication Sydney, Australia
Publisher UniServe Science
Publication Year 2011
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 9780987183408
Editor Manjula Sharma
Alexandra Yeung
Trisha Jenkins
Elizabeth Johnson
Gerry Rayner
Jan West
Start page 114
End page 120
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Abstract/Summary There is a move in higher education institutions in Australia, and internationally, towards the statement of learning outcomes to focus curriculum and allow for accountability of degree programs. Whilst Australian institutions have listed broad, universitywide graduate attributes/capabilities/qualities, science-specific learning outcomes and standards have only more recently been discussed and identified at the national level. The challenge of evaluating program level, science-specific learning outcomes, such as teamwork, communication, writing and quantitative skills along with scientific content knowledge, has emerged. This paper is reporting on a cross-institutional study, which aimed to evaluate student perceptions of learning outcomes gained during undergraduate studies in Biomedical Science at two research-intensive Australian universities using the Science Student Skills Inventory. The results indicate that students gained content knowledge along with writing, communication and team-work skills at equal levels with no statistically significant differences across the two university cohorts. The exception was student’s low perception of building quantitative skills, which differed significantly across the cohorts. The findings suggest that quantitative skills are an area needing further attention. Implications for evaluating program-level learning outcomes framed within the quality assurance versus quality enhancement national policy debate are discussed, along with directions for further research.
Keyword Learning outcomes
Learning standards
Quantitative skills
Evaluation
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Sun, 04 Mar 2012, 09:23:19 EST by Kelly Matthews on behalf of Teaching & Educational Development Institute