Muscle pain differentially modulates short interval intracortical inhibition and intracortical facilitation in primary motor cortex

Schabrun, Siobhan M. and Hodges, Paul W. (2012) Muscle pain differentially modulates short interval intracortical inhibition and intracortical facilitation in primary motor cortex. The Journal of Pain, 13 2: 187-194. doi:10.1016/j.jpain.2011.10.013


Author Schabrun, Siobhan M.
Hodges, Paul W.
Title Muscle pain differentially modulates short interval intracortical inhibition and intracortical facilitation in primary motor cortex
Journal name The Journal of Pain   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1526-5900
1528-8447
Publication date 2012-02
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jpain.2011.10.013
Volume 13
Issue 2
Start page 187
End page 194
Total pages 8
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher Churchill Livingstone
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Abstract Excitability of the motor cortex can be suppressed during muscle pain. Yet the mechanisms are largely unknown. Short interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) and intracortical facilitation (ICF) were examined as possible candidate mechanisms to underpin this change. SICI and ICF were investigated in 11 healthy individuals before, during and after infusion of hypertonic saline into right first dorsal interosseous (FDI). Using paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), interstimulus intervals of 2, 3, and 13 ms were investigated. Pain intensity and quality were recorded using a 10-cm visual analogue scale and the McGill Pain Questionnaire. Resting motor threshold and motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) to single TMS stimuli were recorded before and after pain. Electromyographic recordings were made from right FDI and abductor digiti minimi. Participants reported an average pain intensity of 5.8 (1.6) cm. MEP amplitudes decreased in both muscles. Compared with the pre-pain condition, SICI was increased following pain, but not during. ICF was decreased both during and after pain when compared with the pre-pain condition. These findings suggest that muscle pain differentially modulates SICI and ICF. Although the functional relevance is unknown, we hypothesize decreased facilitation and increased inhibition may contribute to the restriction of movement of a painful body part.
Keyword Experimental muscle pain
Human
Short interval intracortical inhibition
Intracortical facilitation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 27 Feb 2012, 11:57:41 EST by Professor Paul Hodges on behalf of School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences