Fuelling China's rise: Governing capacity in the oil sector

Taylor, Monique (2011). Fuelling China's rise: Governing capacity in the oil sector. In: ISA 2011 Paper Archive. Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition. International Studies Association Annual Conference (ISA, 2011), Montréal, QC, Canada, (). 16-19 March 2011.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Taylor, Monique
Title of paper Fuelling China's rise: Governing capacity in the oil sector
Conference name International Studies Association Annual Conference (ISA, 2011)
Conference location Montréal, QC, Canada
Conference dates 16-19 March 2011
Convener International Studies Association
Proceedings title ISA 2011 Paper Archive. Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition
Place of Publication Eugene, OR, U.S.A.
Publisher All Academic
Publication Year 2011
Sub-type Fully published paper
Open Access Status
Total pages 27
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
I adopt a state-centered institutional approach to provide an explanation of China’s oil policy approach and the country’s responses to both endogenous and exogenous energy challenges. In doing so, I refute both the dominant “fragmentation thesis” used to describe policymaking in China, and the “China Inc” model, which focuses on China’s rise and posits a monolithic, strong and centralized Chinese state. I take the middle ground and submit that China’s oil policy approach is increasingly coherent, and that the capacity of the central government to implement its policy decisions is relatively strong. In the final analysis it is clear that, in many instances, central energy policy objectives have been realized. This is not to say that extant conditions of bureaucratic fragmentation and decentralization do not impact policy formulation and implementation, however, the ability of the center to effectively impose its will on the state’s policy and administrative apparatus should not be underestimated. I argue that Beijing’s state-led approach to energy security is largely a response to domestic priorities and constraints, and is perceived and addressed in terms of a range of increasingly sophisticated state capacities that the central government has at its disposal.
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Presented during Session TC19 "Petro Politics" as "Fueling China's Rise: Governing Capacity in the Oil Sector".

 
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Created: Sun, 26 Feb 2012, 10:47:20 EST by Dr Monique Taylor on behalf of School of Political Science & Internat'l Studies