Environmental drivers of Ross River virus in southeastern Tasmania, Australia: Towards strengthening public health interventions

Werner, A. K., Goater, S., Carver, S., Robertson, G., Allen, G. R. and Weinstein, P. (2012) Environmental drivers of Ross River virus in southeastern Tasmania, Australia: Towards strengthening public health interventions. Epidemiology and Infection, 140 2: 359-371. doi:10.1017/S0950268811000446


Author Werner, A. K.
Goater, S.
Carver, S.
Robertson, G.
Allen, G. R.
Weinstein, P.
Title Environmental drivers of Ross River virus in southeastern Tasmania, Australia: Towards strengthening public health interventions
Journal name Epidemiology and Infection   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0950-2688
1469-4409
Publication date 2012-02
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1017/S0950268811000446
Volume 140
Issue 2
Start page 359
End page 371
Total pages 13
Place of publication Cambridge, United Kingdom
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract
In Australia, Ross River virus (RRV) is predominantly identified and managed through passive health surveillance. Here, the proactive use of environmental datasets to improve community-scale public health interventions in southeastern Tasmania is explored. Known environmental drivers (temperature, rainfall, tide) of the RRV vector Aedes camptorhynchus are analysed against cumulative case records for five adjacent local government areas (LGAs) from 1993 to 2009. Allowing for a 0- to 3-month lag period, temperature was the most significant driver of RRV cases at 1-month lag, contributing to a 23·2% increase in cases above the long-term case average. The potential for RRV to become an emerging public health issue in Tasmania due to projected climate changes is discussed. Moreover, practical outputs from this research are proposed including the development of an early warning system for local councils to implement preventative measures, such as public outreach and mosquito spray programmes.
Keyword Alphavirus
Environmental drivers
Predictive model
Ross River virus
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online: March 2011

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Minerals Industry Safety and Health Centre Publications
Official 2013 Collection
 
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