Interactions Between Ocean Acidification and Warming On the Mortality and Dissolution of Coralline Algae

Diaz-Pulido, Guillermo, Anthony, Kenneth R. N., Kline, David I., Dove, Sophie and Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove (2012) Interactions Between Ocean Acidification and Warming On the Mortality and Dissolution of Coralline Algae. Journal of Phycology, 48 1: 32-39. doi:10.1111/j.1529-8817.2011.01084.x


Author Diaz-Pulido, Guillermo
Anthony, Kenneth R. N.
Kline, David I.
Dove, Sophie
Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove
Title Interactions Between Ocean Acidification and Warming On the Mortality and Dissolution of Coralline Algae
Journal name Journal of Phycology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-3646
1529-8817
Publication date 2012-02
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1529-8817.2011.01084.x
Volume 48
Issue 1
Start page 32
End page 39
Total pages 8
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ, United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Coralline algae are among the most sensitive calcifying organisms to ocean acidification as a result of increased atmospheric carbon dioxide (pCO2). Little is known, however, about the combined impacts of increased pCO2, ocean acidification, and sea surface temperature on tissue mortality and skeletal dissolution of coralline algae. To address this issue, we conducted factorial manipulative experiments of elevated CO2 and temperature and examined the consequences on tissue survival and skeletal dissolution of the crustose coralline alga (CCA) Porolithon (=Hydrolithon) onkodes (Heydr.) Foslie (Corallinaceae, Rhodophyta) on the southern Great Barrier Reef (GBR), Australia. We observed that warming amplified the negative effects of high pCO2 on the health of the algae: rates of advanced partial mortality of CCA increased from <1% to 9% under high CO2 (from 400 to 1,100 ppm) and exacerbated to 15% under warming conditions (from 26°C to 29°C). Furthermore, the effect of pCO2 on skeletal dissolution strongly depended on temperature. Dissolution of P. onkodes only occurred in the high-pCO2 treatment and was greater in the warm treatment. Enhanced skeletal dissolution was also associated with a significant increase in the abundance of endolithic algae. Our results demonstrate that P. onkodes is particularly sensitive to ocean acidification under warm conditions, suggesting that previous experiments focused on ocean acidification alone have underestimated the impact of future conditions on coralline algae. Given the central role that coralline algae play within coral reefs, these conclusions have serious ramifications for the integrity of coral-reef ecosystems.
Keyword Calcification
Carbon dioxide
Carbonate dissolution
Climate change
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article first published online: 7 DEC 2011

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Global Change Institute Publications
Official 2012 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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