Adjustment to loss of the driving role following traumatic brain injury: A qualitative exploration with key stakeholders

Liddle, Jacki, Fleming, Jennifer, McKenna, Kryss, Turpin, Merrill, Whitelaw, Penny and Allen, Shelley (2012) Adjustment to loss of the driving role following traumatic brain injury: A qualitative exploration with key stakeholders. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, 59 1: 79-88. doi:10.1111/j.1440-1630.2011.00978.x


Author Liddle, Jacki
Fleming, Jennifer
McKenna, Kryss
Turpin, Merrill
Whitelaw, Penny
Allen, Shelley
Title Adjustment to loss of the driving role following traumatic brain injury: A qualitative exploration with key stakeholders
Journal name Australian Occupational Therapy Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0045-0766
1440-1630
Publication date 2012-02
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1630.2011.00978.x
Volume 59
Issue 1
Start page 79
End page 88
Total pages 10
Editor Carolyn A. Unsworth
Place of publication Richmond, Vic., Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract Background/aims:  Community mobility is affected by an interruption to or cessation of driving following traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study aimed to examine loss of the driving role and to explore the outcomes associated with driving cessation from the perspectives of key people involved within the process: people with TBI, their family members and involved health professionals.
Methods:  A qualitative methodology was used, employing semi-structured interviews with 15 individuals with TBI who had experienced driving cessation, 10 family members and 10 health professionals working with this population.
Results:  This article focuses on two themes, each with three subthemes. Being stuck: needs related to driving cessation had subthemes: (i) an emotional time, (ii) being normal and (iii) participation without driving. The second theme, A better way: suggestions to improve outcomes had subthemes: (i) information, (ii) support and trying it out and (iii) their family member’s roles and needs.
Conclusions:  Driving cessation following TBI is associated with emotional, identity, transport and participation-related needs. An ongoing, individualised approach involving information, support and practical experiences may improve outcomes of driving cessation for people with TBI and their family members.
Keyword Automobile driving
Community
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article first published online: 7 DEC 2011. Special Issue: Enabling community mobility.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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