Respiratory function and speech breathing patterns in non–ventilator-dependent individuals after cervical spinal cord injury

MacBean, Naomi, Ward, Elizabeth, Murdoch, Bruce, Cahill, Louise and Geraghty, Timothy (2011) Respiratory function and speech breathing patterns in non–ventilator-dependent individuals after cervical spinal cord injury. Journal of Medical Speech Language Pathology, 19 4: 73-87.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author MacBean, Naomi
Ward, Elizabeth
Murdoch, Bruce
Cahill, Louise
Geraghty, Timothy
Title Respiratory function and speech breathing patterns in non–ventilator-dependent individuals after cervical spinal cord injury
Journal name Journal of Medical Speech Language Pathology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1065-1438
Publication date 2011-12
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 19
Issue 4
Start page 73
End page 87
Total pages 15
Place of publication Florence, KY, United States
Publisher Delmar Cengage Learning
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Abstract Cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) typically results in impaired general respiratory function. However, little is known about respiratory mechanics during speech production, with participants involved in research to date showing considerable variation in function and speech output. The current study documented respiratory function (general and during speech) of 17 non-ventilator-dependent individuals after CSCI using perceptual and instrumental (spirometric and kinematic) techniques. As a group, the CSCI participants were found to have reduced general respiratory function; however, considerable individual variation was present. Kinematic analysis revealed the use of typical and atypical speech breathing patterns in relation to control participants, including complete prolonged ribcage paradox and apparent phonation during inspiration. Individuals after CSCI showed adequate respiratory function for speech production during quiet situations, but demonstrated impairment in maximum effort respiratory-phonatory control tasks and in the suprasegmental aspects of speech. The present study confirms that individuals greater than 12 months post-CSCI may continue to present with compromised respiratory capacity and coordination of respiratory musculature during speech production. Further research incorporating the use of electromyography to monitor muscle activation may be beneficial to explain the mechanisms involved in the atypical traces observed and to document the compensatory mechanisms used by individuals after CSCI.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 20 Feb 2012, 14:02:39 EST by Dr Naomi Macbean on behalf of School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences