Influence of cell surface hydrophobicity on attachment of Campylobacter to abiotic surfaces

Nguyen, Vu Tuan, Turner, Mark S. and Dykes, Gary A. (2011) Influence of cell surface hydrophobicity on attachment of Campylobacter to abiotic surfaces. Food Microbiology, 28 5: 942-950. doi:10.1016/j.fm.2011.01.004


Author Nguyen, Vu Tuan
Turner, Mark S.
Dykes, Gary A.
Title Influence of cell surface hydrophobicity on attachment of Campylobacter to abiotic surfaces
Formatted title
Influence of cell surface hydrophobicity on attachment of Campylobacter to abiotic surfaces
Journal name Food Microbiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0740-0020
1095-9998
Publication date 2011-08
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.fm.2011.01.004
Volume 28
Issue 5
Start page 942
End page 950
Total pages 9
Place of publication Camden, London, U.K.
Publisher Academic Press
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
This work aimed to investigate the influence of physicochemical properties and prior mode of growth (planktonic or sessile culture) on attachment of 13 Campylobacter jejuni strains and 5 Campylobacter coli strains isolated from chicken samples to three abiotic surfaces: stainless steel, glass and polyurethane. Water contact angle and zeta potential measurements indicated that the strains varied with respect to surface hydrophobicity (17.6 ± 1.5 to 53.0 ± 2.3°) and surface charge (−3.3 ± 0.4 to −15.1 ± 0.5 mV). Individual strains had different attachment abilities to stainless steel and glass (3.79 ± 0.16 to 5.45 ± 0.08 log cell cm−2) but did not attach to polyurethane, with one exception. Attachment of Campylobacter to abiotic surfaces significantly correlated with cell surface hydrophobicity (P ≤ 0.007), but not with surface charge (P ≥ 0.507). Cells grown as planktonic and sessile culture generally differed significantly from each other with respect to hydrophobicity and attachment (P < 0.05), but not with respect to surface charge (P > 0.05). Principal component analysis (PCA) clustered strains into three groups (planktonic culture) and two groups (sessile culture) representing those with similar hydrophobicity and attachment. Of the four highly hydrophobic and adherent strains, three were C. coli suggesting that isolates with greater hydrophobicity and adherence may occur more frequently among C. coli than C. jejuni strains although this requires further investigation using a larger number of strains. Assignment of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles to PCA groups using Jackknife analysis revealed no overall relationship between bacterial genotypes and bacterial attachment. No relationship between serotype distribution and bacterial attachment was apparent in this study.

Highlights: ► Campylobacter strains differed from each other with respect to surface hydrophobicity and charge. ► Campylobacter strains differed from each other with ability to attach to stainless steel and glass > Only one Campylobacter strain of 15 could attach to polyurethane. ► Attachment of Campylobacter to abiotic surfaces was correlated with hydrophobicity but not charge. ► Principal component analysis clustered strains with like charateristics.
Keyword Campylobacter
Hydrophobicity
Attachment
Stainless steel
Escherichia-coli
Pseudomonas-aeruginosa
Stainless-steel
Jejuni
Adhesion
Poultry
Charge
Strains
Mechanisms
Viability
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 15 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Mon, 20 Feb 2012, 12:07:27 EST by Dr Mark Turner on behalf of School of Land, Crop and Food Sciences