Impulsivity and adolescent substance use: From self-report measures to neuroimaging and beyond

Gullo, Matthew J., Dawe, Sharon and McHugh, Meredith J. (2011). Impulsivity and adolescent substance use: From self-report measures to neuroimaging and beyond. In Michael T. Bardo, Diana H. Fishbein and Richard Milich (Ed.), Inhibitory control and drug abuse prevention: From research to translation (pp. 161-175) New York, United States: Springer. doi:10.1007/978-1-4419-1268-8


Author Gullo, Matthew J.
Dawe, Sharon
McHugh, Meredith J.
Title of chapter Impulsivity and adolescent substance use: From self-report measures to neuroimaging and beyond
Title of book Inhibitory control and drug abuse prevention: From research to translation
Place of Publication New York, United States
Publisher Springer
Publication Year 2011
Sub-type Research book chapter (original research)
DOI 10.1007/978-1-4419-1268-8
ISBN 9781441912671
1441912673
9781441912688
1441912681
Editor Michael T. Bardo
Diana H. Fishbein
Richard Milich
Chapter number 9
Start page 161
End page 175
Total pages 15
Total chapters 17
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Abstract/Summary The capacity to regulate emotional impulses and pursue appropriate long-term goals is an integral part of adaptive human functioning. Therefore, it is not surprising that this capacity consistently emerges as a core trait in biologically-based models of personality. Variously labeled as “impulsivity,” “sensation seeking,” or “constraint” amongst other terms, variations in this trait reliably predict the development of substance use problems in prospective studies. Notably, marked increases in this impulsivity trait appear during adolescence – a period of life when substance experimentation and abuse typically begins. In recent years, neuroimaging research has identified the orbitofrontal and anterior cingulate cortices as important neural substrates of trait impulsivity. Interestingly, these same brain regions undergo substantial development during the teenage years. Indeed, there is remarkable consistency in the time course of these neural changes with those at the level of personality, suggesting both the imaging scanner and the self-report questionnaire are tapping into the same underlying construct, albeit with a differing degree of precision. Despite its far greater precision, the scanner itself cannot be practically employed in large-scale prevention programs to identify teens at risk. However, in validating the biological basis of impulsivity, along with behavioral and self-report measures of the trait, neuroimaging research allows one to use these more cost-effective tools in primary prevention with greater confidence. Indeed, there is already evidence demonstrating the ability of such “blunt” tools to focus and improve prevention programs.
Q-Index Code B1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes xiv, 335 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 24 cm. Part 3.

Document type: Book Chapter
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Created: Wed, 15 Feb 2012, 22:30:16 EST by Matthew Gullo on behalf of Centre for Youth Substance Abuse