Characterizing longitudinal patterns of physical activity in mid-adulthood using latent class analysis: Results from a prospective cohort study

Silverwood, Richard J., Nitsch, Dorothea, Pierce, Mary, Kuh, Diana and Mishra, Gita D. (2011) Characterizing longitudinal patterns of physical activity in mid-adulthood using latent class analysis: Results from a prospective cohort study. American Journal of Epidemiology, 174 12: 1406-1415. doi:10.1093/aje/kwr266

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Author Silverwood, Richard J.
Nitsch, Dorothea
Pierce, Mary
Kuh, Diana
Mishra, Gita D.
Title Characterizing longitudinal patterns of physical activity in mid-adulthood using latent class analysis: Results from a prospective cohort study
Journal name American Journal of Epidemiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0002-9262
1476-6256
Publication date 2011-12-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/aje/kwr266
Volume 174
Issue 12
Start page 1406
End page 1415
Total pages 10
Place of publication Cary, NC, United States
Publisher Oxford University Press
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The authors aimed to describe how longitudinal patterns of physical activity during mid-adulthood (ages 31-53 years) can be characterized using latent class analysis in a population-based birth cohort study, the Medical Research Council's 1946 National Survey of Health and Development. Three different types of physical activity - walking, cycling, and leisure-time physical activity - were analyzed separately using self-reported data collected from questionnaires between 1977 and 1999; 3,847 study members were included in the analysis for one or more types of activity. Patterns of activity differed by sex, so stratified analyses were conducted. Two walking latent classes were identified representing low (52.8% of males in the cohort, 33.5% of females) and high (47.2%, 66.5%) levels of activity. Similar low (91.4%, 82.1%) and high (8.6%, 17.9%) classes were found for cycling, while 3 classes were identified for leisure-time physical activity: "low activity" (46.2%, 48.2%), "sports and leisure activity" (31.0%, 35.3%), and "gardening and do-it-yourself activities" (22.8%, 16.5%). The classes were reasonably or very well separated, with the exception of walking in females. Latent class analysis was found to be a useful tool for characterizing longitudinal patterns of physical activity, even when the measurement instrument differs slightly across ages, which added value in comparison with observed activity at a single age. American Journal of Epidemiology © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.2011This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons. org/licenses/by-nc/3.0), which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited
Keyword Cohort studies
Exercise
Latent class
Leisure Activities
longitudinal studies
Prospective Studies
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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