Telephone-delivered interventions for physical activity and dietary behavior change: An updated systematic review

Goode, Ana D., Reeves, Marina M. and Eakin, Elizabeth G. (2012) Telephone-delivered interventions for physical activity and dietary behavior change: An updated systematic review. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 42 1: 81-88. doi:10.1016/j.amepre.2011.08.025


Author Goode, Ana D.
Reeves, Marina M.
Eakin, Elizabeth G.
Title Telephone-delivered interventions for physical activity and dietary behavior change: An updated systematic review
Journal name American Journal of Preventive Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0749-3797
1873-2607
Publication date 2012-01
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.amepre.2011.08.025
Volume 42
Issue 1
Start page 81
End page 88
Total pages 8
Place of publication New York, United States
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Context: Telephone-delivered interventions targeting physical activity and dietary change have potential for broad population reach and thus have a role to play in addressing increasing rates of lifestyle-related chronic diseases. The purpose of this systematic review is to update the evidence for their potential to inform translation, including effectiveness in promoting maintenance, reporting on implementation, and costs.
Evidence acquisition: A structured search of PubMed, MEDLINE, and PsycINFO (January 2006 to April 2010) was conducted. Included studies reported on physical activity and/or dietary change in adults, delivered at least 50% of intervention contacts by telephone, and included a control group (except in dissemination studies). Detailed information on study design, intervention features, and behavioral outcomes was extracted, tabulated, and summarized.
Evidence synthesis: Twenty-five studies (27 comparisons) were included: 16 for physical activity, two for diet, and seven for combined interventions. Twenty of 27 comparisons found evidence for initiation of behavior change (14 of 17 comparisons for physical activity; two of two for diet; four of eight for combined interventions). Ten of 25 studies evaluated post-intervention maintenance of change, with three reporting that maintenance was achieved for at least 50% of outcomes. Dissemination studies were rare (n=3), as were dose–response (n=2) and cost-effectiveness analyses (n=2).
Conclusions: Given the strength of evidence for telephone-delivered physical activity and dietary change interventions, greater emphasis on dissemination studies is warranted.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Available online 15 December 2011

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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