Phellinus noxius: A basidiomycete fungus impacting productivity of Australian avocados

Dann, E.K., Smith, L.A., Shuey, L.S. and Begum, F. (2011). Phellinus noxius: A basidiomycete fungus impacting productivity of Australian avocados. In: 7th World Avocado Congress 2011 - Conference Proceedings. 7th World Avocado Congress, Cairns, QLD, Australia, (63-63). 5-9 September 2011.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Dann, E.K.
Smith, L.A.
Shuey, L.S.
Begum, F.
Title of paper Phellinus noxius: A basidiomycete fungus impacting productivity of Australian avocados
Conference name 7th World Avocado Congress
Conference location Cairns, QLD, Australia
Conference dates 5-9 September 2011
Proceedings title 7th World Avocado Congress 2011 - Conference Proceedings
Publication Year 2011
Sub-type Published abstract
Start page 63
End page 63
Total pages 1
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Phellinus noxius (Pn) is a basidiomycete fungus which is widespread in tropical and subtropical regions of the world and has a host range of over 200 (mostly woody) species. In situations where monoculture orchards or plantations have replaced native rainforest, the fungus may infect and cause brown root rot disease, premature death of trees and significant economic losses (eg. rubber, oil palm, mahogany, teak, longan and pear). In Australia, the first positive identification of Pn causing death of avocado trees occurred in 2002 in the Sunshine Coast hinterland, QLD. The orchard was close to remnant rainforest with many trees known to be infected with Pn. Scoping studies during 2007 to 2009 showed that brown root rot is a significant problem for many avocado producers in the Atherton Tablelands and Childers/Bundaberg areas of QLD. These areas represent over 50% of the total Australian avocado production. The disease has also been confirmed in northern NSW, and is spread by root-to-root contact, and potentially also by the movement of airborne basidiospores, produced in bracket-like fruiting bodies. These structures have not been observed on avocado, but do occur on other species, eg. hoop pine and Ficus. P. noxius is reliably identified by DNA sequencing methods. We will present our approach for defining the role of basidiospores in the spread of the disease. We will also outline our research for determining effective management strategies which may include fungicide treatments, cultural practices and replanting with non-infective hosts.
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Pests & Disease: Fruit & root diseases and their management

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation
 
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Created: Fri, 03 Feb 2012, 13:13:34 EST by Dr Elizabeth Dann on behalf of Qld Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation