Hepatotoxicosis in dogs consuming a diet of camel meat contaminated with indospicine

Fitzgerald, L. M., Paul, A., Fletcher, M. T., Mansfield, C. S. and O'Hara, A. J. (2011) Hepatotoxicosis in dogs consuming a diet of camel meat contaminated with indospicine. Australian Veterinary Journal, 89 3: 95-100. doi:10.1111/j.1751-0813.2010.00684.x

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Author Fitzgerald, L. M.
Paul, A.
Fletcher, M. T.
Mansfield, C. S.
O'Hara, A. J.
Title Hepatotoxicosis in dogs consuming a diet of camel meat contaminated with indospicine
Journal name Australian Veterinary Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0005-0423
1751-0813
Publication date 2011-03-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1751-0813.2010.00684.x
Volume 89
Issue 3
Start page 95
End page 100
Total pages 6
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background Four dogs presented with clinical signs of severe hepatic disease after consuming a commercial camel meat diet.
Methods Laboratory investigation revealed evidence of severe liver disease, including markedly increased serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity and total bilirubin concentration, and prolonged clotting times.
Results Two dogs deteriorated despite supportive therapy and were euthanased. Histologically, both livers appeared similar, with the main lesion being extensive periacinar necrosis and haemorrhage. Indospicine, a toxic amino acid of plant origin, was detected in the serum and/or plasma from all four dogs, as well as in tissues of a dog that was necropsied and in a sample of the camel meat fed to this animal. Serum biochemistry tests using blood samples collected from 15 additional dogs identified as having eaten the diet detected indospicine was in the serum of 14 and 3 had increased ALT activity. One of the latter dogs subsequently developed clinical signs of severe liver disease and was euthanased.
Conclusion To the authors' knowledge, this is the first published report of the detection of indospicine residues in camel meat and the occurrence of severe, sometimes fatal, liver disease in dogs that consumed this contaminated meat.
Keyword Camel meat
Dogs
Hepatotoxicosis
Indigofera spp.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation
School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
 
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Created: Fri, 03 Feb 2012, 22:27:51 EST by Dr Mary Fletcher on behalf of School of Chemistry & Molecular Biosciences