Cashcow for vets: Using foetal-aging to improve the reproductive management of beef herds

McGowan, Michael, McCosker, Kieren, Fordyce, Geoffry, Smith, Dave, Burns, Brian, Jephcott, Sandi, Newsome, Tom, Menzies, Don, Joyner, Di, Perkins Nigel and O'Rourke, Peter (2011). Cashcow for vets: Using foetal-aging to improve the reproductive management of beef herds. In: Proceedings of the AVA Annual Conference 2011. Australian Veterinary Association Annual Conference (AVA, 2011), Adelaide, Australia, (E3.1.1-E3.1.5). 15-20 May 2011.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author McGowan, Michael
McCosker, Kieren
Fordyce, Geoffry
Smith, Dave
Burns, Brian
Jephcott, Sandi
Newsome, Tom
Menzies, Don
Joyner, Di
Perkins Nigel
O'Rourke, Peter
Title of paper Cashcow for vets: Using foetal-aging to improve the reproductive management of beef herds
Conference name Australian Veterinary Association Annual Conference (AVA, 2011)
Conference location Adelaide, Australia
Conference dates 15-20 May 2011
Convener Australian Veterinary Association
Proceedings title Proceedings of the AVA Annual Conference 2011
Place of Publication St Leonards, NSW, Australia
Publisher The Australian Veterinary Association (AVA)
Publication Year 2011
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 9780980796711
0980796717
ISSN 0728-8425
Start page E3.1.1
End page E3.1.5
Total pages 5
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
The paper will describe using examples from the MLA funded Cash Cow project how foetal aging data can be used to improve the reproductive management of beef herds.

The Cash Cow project (B.NBP.0382) funded by Meat and Livestock Australia, commenced in 2007 and is now in its final year of data collection. Comprehensive regional-, property-, paddock-, and animal-level data has been collected from 165 management groups (mobs) on 78 commercial properties located in the Kimberley’s, the Northern Territory and throughout Queensland. All females enrolled in the project (approximately 70,000) are electronically identified (NLIS) and animal-level data (lactation status, body condition score, hip height, udder score, pregnancy status and foetal-age) has been electronically captured crush-side by a commercial company, Outcross Performance Pty Ltd (Outcross) working with co-operating cattle veterinarians. The enrolled mobs will be monitored for 2 complete reproductive cycles i.e (from pregnancy diagnosis after joining in control mated mobs, or at the second annual muster of the year in continuously mated mobs, to calving and weaning and pregnancy diagnosis after rejoining) X 2. Univariate analysis of factors affecting the likelihood of females becoming pregnant, and likelihood of pregnant females weaning a calf for the first reproductive cycle has recently been completed.

The Cash Cow project has demonstrated the usefulness of conducting foetal-aging as part of routine pregnancy diagnosis of beef herds in northern Australia. Foetal-aging enables cattle veterinarians to estimate conception and calving dates for individual females, the prerequisite data required to:
a) create conception and calving patterns for individual breeding mobs
b) investigate factors affecting the likelihood of females becoming pregnant and/or pregnant females weaning a calf
c) investigate factors affecting the reproductive performance of breeding mobs
d) develop recommendations to control the impact of identified factors on reproductive outcomes
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Presented during the Session "Cattle" as "Using foetal aging to improve the reproductive management of beef herds: Observations from the Cash Cow project".

 
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Created: Thu, 02 Feb 2012, 13:23:29 EST by Dr Geoffry Fordyce on behalf of School of Veterinary Science