The role of familism in stress and coping processes among African American and white dementia caregivers: Effects on mental and physical health

Kim, Jung-Hyun, Knight, Bob G. and Longmire, Crystal V. Flynn (2007) The role of familism in stress and coping processes among African American and white dementia caregivers: Effects on mental and physical health. Health Psychology, 26 5: 564-576. doi:10.1037/0278-6133.26.5.564


Author Kim, Jung-Hyun
Knight, Bob G.
Longmire, Crystal V. Flynn
Title The role of familism in stress and coping processes among African American and white dementia caregivers: Effects on mental and physical health
Journal name Health Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0278-6133
1930-7810
Publication date 2007-09-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1037/0278-6133.26.5.564
Volume 26
Issue 5
Start page 564
End page 576
Total pages 13
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher American Psychological Association
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: To explore how familism, burden, and coping styles mediate the relationships between ethnicity and the mental and physical health of caregivers. Design: A probability sample of 65 White and 95 African Americans respondents caring for an older family member with dementia was used to test hypotheses from a sociocultural stress and coping model using path analysis. Main outcome measures: Measures of caregivers’ health included subjective health, self-reported diseases, blood pressure, and heart rate. Mental health measures included self-reported depression and psychological symptoms. Results: Contrary to the hypothesis, familism had an adverse effect on outcomes and was related to low education levels rather than to African American ethnicity. A buffering effect of active coping between being African American and diastolic blood pressure was found even after controlling for levels of education. Conclusions: Findings supported a core stress and coping model in which more behavior problems of care recipients were associated with poorer mental health of caregivers via greater burden and more use of avoidant coping. Results also demonstrate that this core model can be extended to physical health.
Keyword Caregiving
Ethnicity
African Americans
Stress
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: ERA 2012 Admin Only
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 26 Jan 2012, 02:21:36 EST by Mr Mathew Carter on behalf of School of Psychology