Investigating the anticipatory nature of pattern perception in sport

Gorman, Adam D., Abernethy, Bruce and Farrow, Damian (2011) Investigating the anticipatory nature of pattern perception in sport. Memory and Cognition, 39 5: 894-901. doi:10.3758/s13421-010-0067-7


Author Gorman, Adam D.
Abernethy, Bruce
Farrow, Damian
Title Investigating the anticipatory nature of pattern perception in sport
Journal name Memory and Cognition   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0090-502X
1532-5946
Publication date 2011-07
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3758/s13421-010-0067-7
Volume 39
Issue 5
Start page 894
End page 901
Total pages 8
Place of publication New York, NY, U.S.A.
Publisher Springer
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The aim of the present study was to examine the anticipatory nature of pattern perception in sport by using static and moving basketball patterns across three different display types. Participants of differing skill levels were included in order to determine whether the effects would be moderated by the knowledge and experience of the observer in the same manner reported previously for simple images. The results from a pattern recognition task showed that both expert and recreational participants were more likely to anticipate the next likely state of a pattern when it was presented as a moving video, but only the experts appeared to have the depth of understanding required to elicit the same anticipatory encoding for patterns presented as schematic images. The results extend those reported in previous research and provide further evidence of an anticipatory encoding in pattern perception for images containing complex, interrelated patterns.
Keyword Representational momentum
Anticipation
Pattern perception
Expertise
Transfer
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 19 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 19 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 25 Jan 2012, 12:15:49 EST by Deborah Noon on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences